Archive for the 'Suet Feeders' Category

squirrel proof bird feeders for peace of mind – let them choose with an e-gift!


December 22, 2012
posted by birdhouse chick @ 12:07 am

e-gift cards by Christmas!

 

squirrel proof bird feedersOut of time? Out of good ideas? Read on!

Ok, so he’s a chipmunk, but squirrels can be infuriating for some, while others actually encourage them with specialty feeders that are pretty entertaining to watch. Investing in quality squirrel proof bird feeders ultimately saves money by saving birdseed, and we promise… they make for better and more relaxing backyard bird watching!

Some squirrel proof feeders a hoot to watch, like the Droll Yankees line of Flippers, Whippers, Tippers and Dippers… yes, they really do have different features. Many styles of caged feeders keep little paws and claws from reaching seed through sheer design and structure. Even if squirrels can get to the cage, they can’t reach the seed, and soon give up.

The Suet Sanctuary is the original suet feeder that’s squirrel proof too. Reaching little hands just can’t reach the suet. Smaller songbirds, and even some woodpeckers can dine in peace, without wasting suet to gobbling, piggy squirrels.

Another fantastic squirrel proof bird feeder is Arundale’s line of Sky Cafes. The video is hilarious and they’re considered the “Fort Knox” of bird feeders. The innovative design keeps squirrels at bay, no matter their level of acrobatic expertise!

The good news is you can still make someones’ Christmas Day stupendous by sending an e-gift card so they can choose their own squirrel-proof bird feeder or squirrel feeder, or bird feeder, or birdhouse! We’ll even design a handsome certificate and forward it along to the recipient, or to you for color printing. Just box it, wrap it, place it under the tree and viola… Christmas gift extraordinaire… immediately!

be ready for the season with homemade nesting materials


February 9, 2012
posted by birdhouse chick @ 7:13 pm

Gathering nesting materials now will encourage nest building this season around your yard.The cold weather of winter leaves behind some clues for us (if we look) from the previous busy season of the avian world. Simply look up and take notice. Barren-looking trees with their foliage stripped will reveal the nests of several species, and what they’ve used for nesting materials.

Large, messy nests are usually the work of squirrels, while a smaller nest consisting of twigs and grasses may be that of a Cardinal, Blue Jay, or Mockingbird. An even smaller nest with tightly woven plant fibers, maybe even some milkweed or thistle down still attached would be the work of an American Goldfinch. You’d have to search a bit harder to find nests from Bluebirds, Chickadees, or Nuthatches, as these birds nest in cavities or birdhouses. You can easily encourage nest building around your place this season by offering nesting materials before the season actually starts. Although there are many cool kinds of materials and holders available, this is most definitely a “do-it-yourselfer”!

Start by gathering nesting materials now. Feathers and pet hair are preferred by Chickadees, while decorative mosses (Spanish, Sphagnum, and that thin, curly straw-like stuff) might be used by many species mentioned above. Bright cotton yarns add a nice touch too, as variety is the spice of life. Although I’ve always heard that dryer lint is a good one… our local birds have never touched it when previously offered. Stay away from plastics, fishing line, and the like. These can get tangled around nestlings or their legs, proving to be hazardous, and sometimes fatal.

Now, what to put your nesting materials in? That part is simple! A standard suet cage works perfectly, as do the mesh produce bags from the grocery store (the kind apples come in). The Suet and Fruit Feeders often work well for nesting materials tooSpring Feeder shown here is just that, meant for fruit or suet. We’ve found whole peanuts and our nesting materials work great in them too. Talk about versatility! Put a mixture of materials in several holders and hang them from branches around your yard where the birds will see them. Do pull some materials through to get started, but don’t pack them in too tightly. Birds need to be able to pull them out fairly easily, and should the rain saturate the nesting material, it will dry quickly if air can flow through it. So start gathering… and here’s to many successful broods this season!

 

Hold your nuts in all kinds of peanut bird feeders!


April 14, 2011
posted by birdhouse chick @ 11:14 am

Fun wreath peanut bird feeder for whole peanutsAttract many kinds of birds… and squirrels too if you don’t add a baffle to peanut bird feeders! Wood Peckers, Nuthatches and Blue Jays especially love whole peanuts in the shell, and there are so many cool ways to offer up this wild bird delicacy. There are lots of peanut bird feeders available for shelled peanuts too if you’d rather not contend with the ground waste, and birds like them equally as well. The wreath feeder shown here makes a fun peanut feeder, fruit feeder, or even a  nesting material container in spring.

A Recycled Plastic Double Suet Feeder works great for feeding peanuts too

 

A plain old suet cage or basket is a great way to offer peanuts. These cages, whether double, single, inexpensive, or quality recycled plastic make perfect peanut bird feeders. They’re terrific for offering nesting materials in spring, and work wonderfully for serving fruit in summer to attract migratory birds. Now that’s versatility! Even if you don’t feed suet to your birds, the cage-like design makes them perfect for year round use. In fact, this recycled plastic double suet feeder is actually deemed a three-in-one feeder-for suet, peanuts, or fruit.

A suet feeder sreving fruit to orioles, make great penutut bird feeders tooThis suet feeder has Orioles chowing down on oranges in summer, but you can attract a wide variety of feathered friends year round with suet feeders used for peanuts, nesting material, and oh yeah… suet too!