Archive for the 'Fruit Bird Feeder' Category

do fruit in wild bird feeders for summer season!


July 5, 2013
posted by birdhouse chick @ 9:14 am

fruit feeder-thrasherThe best of summer… when everything seems bolder and more alive. Gardens pop with vivid color, and many birds’ plumage is at its brightest before molting. Colorful fruits are also a great idea for wild bird feeders! Migratory birds (as well as a few residents) enjoy various fruits as part of their healthy diet too 🙂

Adding a new dimension to feeding wild birds, fresh fruit offers great variety for many species, there’s just so much more than plain old birdseed. Staked, platform and open dish feeders accommodate many types of foods – allowing you to change things up with seasons. Got a suet feeder? Simply try orange slices for orioles, woodpeckers, cat birds and others.Wild bird feeders for suet are a great option for offering fruit in summer

Some very wild bird feeders accommodate fruit for simmer and suet for winter feeding.

Some staked and dish feeders are far from boring, fun designs to add a splash of color, or even bring a smile to say any cat enthusiast! With these wild bird feeders, suet is perfect for winter feeding too, and there’s lots of recipes online (and on our site) to make your own. Large formed balls work best on the pin, and by mixing a big batch, it’ can be stored in the freezer for ease of use.

Because variety is the spice of life, mix it up for your feathered friend this summer! You never know who may stop by, and after all, you can always revert to boring birdseed in your feeders!

 

 

live worms escaping your mealworm feeder?


June 27, 2013
posted by birdhouse chick @ 11:14 am

an open dish mealworm feeder accommodates a variety of treats for wild birdsA customer’s question grabbed our attention: “How do you keep the worms inside the mealworm feeder?”

Tooth, texture… that’s what it’s all about here. If the surface of the feeder is not smooth as glass, the wiggly, crawly delights get hold and simply crawl right out! Now this is a huge advantage to ground feeding birds like robins – ours actually sit and wait below the mealworm feeder. But for bluebirds, chickadees, nuthatches, warblers, swallows and titmice, they have to swoop down to catch their worms if they’ve all crawled out.

So what’s the point of using a hanging dish feeder if worms end up on the ground? Not much! If you’re feeding live worms, it’s best to use a feeder that has absolutely no texture on the inside surface. Worms will stay put longer, and while juveniles are learning to use feeders, this is helpful.

An open dish type feeder will also accommodate a good variety of other treats to entice wild birds. Oranges used in this double-dish model have orioles flocking and teaching babies where the good stuff is! Suet chunks and peanuts are also good options for winter feeding.

Smooth, plexi-glass meal worm feeders like this are available in staked, hanging and even pole-mounted options. They’re durable for year-round use and dishwasher safe. Birds can perch anywhere on the dish – making it easier to land and feed. The vertical hangers are long enough to use with a weather guard, or even a baffle should squirrels be a problem around your place.

If you’re on the squeamish side and can’t bear the thought of live worms, birds will also go for dried worms. In fact they pack more protein per serving! Consider a dish style mealworm feeder this season… they work great for more than just worms!

 

unusual butterfly feeder with sea sponge makes it easy for the flying jewels to drink

Love cool stuff! These butterfly feeders(coming soon) do double duty for fruit lovers like; Warblers, Thrashers, Woodpeckers, and lots of other migratory friends who adore fruit and/or jelly. An Oriole’s favorite, the center may be filled with jelly, while orange quarters are placed right along side.

As a nectar feeder for butterflies, the sea sponge is included. It acts as a wick-absorbing the liquid because butterflies will not drink from an open source. This method recreates how the flying gems actually draw nectar from flowers. Over-ripened fruit may also be placed on the outer dish, offering butterflies a varied and swell refuge.

Handcrafted of weather-proof stoneware, lead-free glazes, and brass chain, it’s safe outdoors year-round.  The feeder may also be placed in the dishwasher for a quick & thorough cleaning. Lure butterflies to your place offering nectar and fruit together in this groovy, hand-made feeder.

Versatile feeding Stalk makes a great butterfly feeder using over-ripened fruit.And speaking of fruit, butterflies enjoy a variety of over-ripened ones. Grapes, oranges, melons, peaches, apples and berries will entice them to nibble and come back for more. This durable stalk feeder is perfect for creating a fruit smorgasbord, even corn on the cob works well in winter after butterfly migration is complete. (Yes… some folks really do feed the squirrels!)

Of course habitat plays a key role in attracting butterflies, and omitting pesticides will prove most beneficial. Nectar-producing flowers (lantana, abelia, and butterfly bush) are most common, and should be included in the landscape. Host plants are also required, and will likely deteriorate with munching! Milkweed, parsley and cabbage are a few favorites caterpillars love (and need) for growth to chrysalis stage.

Ever witnessed the stages of a butterfly metamorphosis? Until seeing the video below, I can’t say that I have! Truly a masterpiece of nature, it’s worth the watch!

fun squirrel feeders go recycled and large capacity too


June 3, 2012
posted by birdhouse chick @ 6:02 pm

Table and Chair Squirrel Feeders go green in recycled plasticYes, some of us do feed the squirrels! Some just for fun and the entertainment aspect, others feed them as a deterrent from bird feeders, keeping them occupied. And some, well they just despise the little critters. After all they are a member of the rodent family, but for some reason, the bushy tail seems to make them okay?

The Table & Chair Feeder is a classic that’s been around forever, and they last for years until the wood starts to crack and rot from exposure to the elements. Now this fun feeder has gone green, as in recycled plastic. It won’t crack, fade, split or warp… guaranteed! The best thing about recycled plastic anything, is that it helps keeps these plastics out of landfills. Some products come with stickers telling you how many milk jugs, or containers were used to manufacture the item, which is pretty cool. These fun squirrel feeders are made to last, chew-proof and handsome too, the little critters will love them. As a special treat during frigid weather, we smear peanut butter on the corn cobs… they go crazy for it! The high fat & protein content provides the extra calories needed for energy to stay warm, and it tastes good too.

But if one single corn cob isn’t enough for your pack, the large capacity stalk Large capacity squirrel feeders like the stalk hold twelve ears of corn at once.feeder might be in order. These are perfect for corn cobs (and fruit too in summer). Attract orioles, cat birds, woodpeckers and other migratory friends with orange slices, apples or grapes during warm weather. These squirrel feeders hold lots of corn (12 ears), but if your furry friend, little pigs are like ours… no amount of food ever seems to be enough!

Hey… and thanks for feeding the squirrels 🙂

 

be ready for the season with homemade nesting materials


February 9, 2012
posted by birdhouse chick @ 7:13 pm

Gathering nesting materials now will encourage nest building this season around your yard.The cold weather of winter leaves behind some clues for us (if we look) from the previous busy season of the avian world. Simply look up and take notice. Barren-looking trees with their foliage stripped will reveal the nests of several species, and what they’ve used for nesting materials.

Large, messy nests are usually the work of squirrels, while a smaller nest consisting of twigs and grasses may be that of a Cardinal, Blue Jay, or Mockingbird. An even smaller nest with tightly woven plant fibers, maybe even some milkweed or thistle down still attached would be the work of an American Goldfinch. You’d have to search a bit harder to find nests from Bluebirds, Chickadees, or Nuthatches, as these birds nest in cavities or birdhouses. You can easily encourage nest building around your place this season by offering nesting materials before the season actually starts. Although there are many cool kinds of materials and holders available, this is most definitely a “do-it-yourselfer”!

Start by gathering nesting materials now. Feathers and pet hair are preferred by Chickadees, while decorative mosses (Spanish, Sphagnum, and that thin, curly straw-like stuff) might be used by many species mentioned above. Bright cotton yarns add a nice touch too, as variety is the spice of life. Although I’ve always heard that dryer lint is a good one… our local birds have never touched it when previously offered. Stay away from plastics, fishing line, and the like. These can get tangled around nestlings or their legs, proving to be hazardous, and sometimes fatal.

Now, what to put your nesting materials in? That part is simple! A standard suet cage works perfectly, as do the mesh produce bags from the grocery store (the kind apples come in). The Suet and Fruit Feeders often work well for nesting materials tooSpring Feeder shown here is just that, meant for fruit or suet. We’ve found whole peanuts and our nesting materials work great in them too. Talk about versatility! Put a mixture of materials in several holders and hang them from branches around your yard where the birds will see them. Do pull some materials through to get started, but don’t pack them in too tightly. Birds need to be able to pull them out fairly easily, and should the rain saturate the nesting material, it will dry quickly if air can flow through it. So start gathering… and here’s to many successful broods this season!

 

Hold your nuts in all kinds of peanut bird feeders!


April 14, 2011
posted by birdhouse chick @ 11:14 am

Fun wreath peanut bird feeder for whole peanutsAttract many kinds of birds… and squirrels too if you don’t add a baffle to peanut bird feeders! Wood Peckers, Nuthatches and Blue Jays especially love whole peanuts in the shell, and there are so many cool ways to offer up this wild bird delicacy. There are lots of peanut bird feeders available for shelled peanuts too if you’d rather not contend with the ground waste, and birds like them equally as well. The wreath feeder shown here makes a fun peanut feeder, fruit feeder, or even a  nesting material container in spring.

A Recycled Plastic Double Suet Feeder works great for feeding peanuts too

 

A plain old suet cage or basket is a great way to offer peanuts. These cages, whether double, single, inexpensive, or quality recycled plastic make perfect peanut bird feeders. They’re terrific for offering nesting materials in spring, and work wonderfully for serving fruit in summer to attract migratory birds. Now that’s versatility! Even if you don’t feed suet to your birds, the cage-like design makes them perfect for year round use. In fact, this recycled plastic double suet feeder is actually deemed a three-in-one feeder-for suet, peanuts, or fruit.

A suet feeder sreving fruit to orioles, make great penutut bird feeders tooThis suet feeder has Orioles chowing down on oranges in summer, but you can attract a wide variety of feathered friends year round with suet feeders used for peanuts, nesting material, and oh yeah… suet too!

 

Add Fruit Bird Feeders in Summer


June 15, 2010
posted by birdhouse chick @ 8:35 am

Summer time is when migrating, tropical songbirds with vibrant colors head our way to North America. These gorgeous birds with sweet songs will grace your backyard if offerings are right. A birdbath is a must, as a fresh water source will attract more species any time of year. Most fruit bird feeders are versatile enough to use year round, by placing suet balls on them in winter. Nectar feeders, sans the lid may be filled with seed mixes, suet or mealworms in winter too. Some fruit feeders accommodate nectar and jelly, or nectar and fruit to entice a wider variety of birds.

And Orioles aren’t the only birds who enjoy fruit. Woodpeckers are attracted to apples and melon, while hummingbirds covet their nectar feeders. You’ll also attract Catbirds, Flickers, Cactus Wrens and even Chickadees by having fruit or jelly feeders in your yard. Butterflies enjoy fruit as well, a bit over ripe-but definitely not moldy. Try bananas, oranges, berries and melon to entice butterflies too. Many of the new fruit bird feeders are made of recycled plastics, with a much longer lifespan, they’re guaranteed to never crack, split or fade. So, before summer passes you by, place one of these versatile feeders in the garden and see who comes around to visit!

Funny Fruit Bird Feeder


June 10, 2010
posted by birdhouse chick @ 8:28 pm

Part of the pleasure of feeding wild birds is the added esthetic it brings to your environment. Simply put, folks like to look at artistic, fun, fancy and whimsical things. Bird feeders are no exception, with every make and model imaginable!

This fruit bird feeder is really a hoot, the Angel Cat he’s called. But more than fun, he’s a totally functional feeder for year round use. Maybe your resident birds don’t eat fruit in winter, but sure as day…they’ll eat suet when temperatures are freezing. And that’s the beauty of this fruit bird feeder-it can be used for suet balls in winter time. Change up fruit offerings and see who comes around. Orioles are a sure bet for orange halves, while apples and melon may attract woodpeckers.

With a total of six perches, (3 in front-3 in back) there’s plenty of room for birds to stop and feed. And with the large rustic, movable wings and tail, birds may perch here as well, to rest a bit or wait their turn for some chow.

Hand crafted of fast growth, renewable wood, the Angel Cat makes a great gift for any birding enthusiast, cat person, or nature lover on your gift list!