• Bird Houses

    Moms Deserve the Best Birdhouse for Mother’s Day

    Mama Hummingbird Feeding BabiesHard working Moms deserve the best for Mother’s Day… simply because they ARE the best!

    Whether human, winged or 4-legged, Mom works harder than anyone else in the family unit. Let’s face it- if it were up to Dad to lay eggs, there would be no babies!  The same is widely said of humans too 🙂

    Although bluebird dads participate equally in the rearing of nestlings- it’s mom who lays the eggs, and mom who has the featherless brood patch for incubation.Best Birdhouse-Bird Feeder in Use

    Yesterday was National Bird Day and although we may have missed it… we celebrate backyard birds everyday for the sheer joy and calming effect they have when one takes the time to observe. Chaos is lifted, you’re absolutely unplugged, no tracking or pop-up ads (don’t you just despise them?)

    While Dad gets all the vivid color and glory in the avian world, Mom is really the superhero… what’s up with that? It’s true of cardinals, bluebirds, grosbeaks, orioles and so many other resident and migratory fliers who visit our yards.

    Not all birds use houses, some may never even visit your feeders. That’s not to say you can’t offer the best birdhouse for those who do!

    What makes it the best? First and foremost- it’s the one you will maintain! Be it a birdhouse, feeder or birdbath- they must be monitored and kept clean for birds.

    A leaky birdhouse sitting with bug-infested rotted nest is of no use at all. A bird feeder with nasty seed only serves to spread mold spores and bacteria which can be fatal to birds in the form of respiratory disease. This is very common among finches, pine siskins and the like.

    Best Birdhouse for Mothers DayA birdbath with no water… say what!? Yup, that’s what your birds will say to that one 🙁  Because we do attract birds in unnatural populations, it’s our responsibility to keep them from becoming sick.

    So what else makes the best birdhouse-bird feeder? Functionality, for sure! Feeders should be easy to clean and they should keep seed dry. Birds should have easy access as well. Houses should have the proper entry size for the birds you’re wanting to host and of course proper ventilation and drainage.

    Best Birdhouse for Mother's DayWhile a chickadee needs only 1-1/8″ hole size, an Eastern bluebird requires 1-1/5″ entry. And so help us- if we find the neighbor who has the birdhouse with gigantic gaping hole… because this is where dreaded starlings have decided to take up residence. And they come to our yard to feed!

    Last, handmade designs will always make for timeless and stunning gifts! Crafted by artisans who have a passion for wild birds, the unique birdhouse-bird feeders are more than just objects. Also serving as garden decor, these pieces display one’s talent and soul that went into creating the art. Mediums vary from wood, to copper, pottery and more, some are even one-of-a-kinds and signed/stamped by the artist. All are bird-approved- making them by far, the best birdhouse gift for Mother’s Day… and for the mama birds around her place too!

    Best Birdhouse for Mother's Day

    Best birdhouse for Mother's Day

    Best Birdhouse for Mother's Day

     

  • Bird Houses

    Easter Egg-Stravaganza Inside Birdhouses!

    Happy Easter Eggs in Your BirdhouseHappy Easter and Happy Passover!

    Things are greening up nicely, the promise of spring and re-birth. It’s a most exciting time in the garden and for backyard birders! Cabin fever prevails and folks are itching to get outside and start digging in the dirt. We’ve even refreshed our age old blog by redesigning for this century… yes, it’s that old, we’ve been around a good while now because the passion for birding still exists.

    Rough patch of weather for the nesting birds in our North Georgia yard. The usual suspects; a chickadee nest with 5 eggs, bluebirds with 4 nestlings in the Gilbertson box in back, bluebirds with 5 eggs in front, white breasted nuthatches in back and their smaller cousins- brown headed nuthatches in front.

    This is not to mention those who don’t use birdhouses; cardinals definitely have a nest as they’re back and forth from mealworm feeders. Oh yes, we let everybody have some worms…except starlings, the dreaded nuisance birds are back but this too shall pass.

    The Boston ferns are up with nest starts in 2 of them. Don’t want birds nesting in your ferns? Simply avoid offering  the habitat and forego the ferns this year. Should you enjoy seeing a family of house finches so close to home (as we do), simply take the fern down to water by submersing the bottom in a bucket of water. Take care not to get their nest wet. Everyone’s been very busy staking out territory and claiming birdhouses!

    We headed over to the local alpaca farm last week to score tons of fur for our spring “free nesting material promo”. Freshly sheared alpacas for free nesting materials Freshly sheared, the alpacas are so sweet and such a joy to hang around with while chatting with owners of the farm.

    After an unusually wet winter in the southeast, nesting activity seemed to get a late start. Warm days of April have been fab, but the last two days have been freezing and wet. If you’ve still got old man winter hanging around… thankfully it won’t be too long!

    Goldfinches have turned their drab colors into electric yellow, molting in what seemed to be overnight. Hummingbirds arrived about 2 weeks ago (the only good thing about tax time). And just today, two indigo buntings were spotted at feeders. Migration’s in full swing… and it’s coming to a theater near you soon! Not sure who’s arriving when? Check Journey North.org to track migratory progressions, great website with helpful info!

    Are your hummingbirds back yet? Social media is a great place to find birding groups with lots of Q&A’s posted. The info may not always be correct though! Most times, others will chime in to offer their expertise and advice, one could learn much if new to attracting and hosting bluebirds or the first season offering hummingbird feeders. Here’s a general map of when to expect the tiny sprites, but JourneyNorth provides more detailed info.Ruby Throated Migration Map- General Zones

    We’re hoping to catch a few orioles (who isn’t?), so grape jelly and oranges are on the menu. Rose breasted grosbeaks are a sure sign, but this year Cornell Lab reported the birds were spotted pretty far north of normal range during winter. A Baltimore oriole was made famous on social media as he spent his winter in Wisconsin! The host kept the bird fed with oranges and grape jelly, giving general info on his condition since this past January. He hung around all winter and is doing just fine!

    Other “outta sorters” were Carolina wrens in Minnesota. This pair actually caught the attention of The Audubon Society for filming and research. Ranges are changing and it’s interesting to see who’s where at different times of the year.

    We wish you a happy holiday and happy spring with lots of busy birding activity around your place!

  • Bird Houses

    Whose Eggs Are In Your Birdhouse?

    Just when you thought this is it… a family of bluebirds or chickadees- nature might play a most wicked April Fool’s joke! Except it’s not funny and most times fatal to nestlings.Cowbird in Carolina Wren Nest

    Should you become inquisitive and brave enough to monitor the nest inside your birdhouse (yes, it’s recommended) and spot an egg that’s different in size and/or color- it’s likely the wicked antics of a cowbird. Eggs that may be in your birdhouse

    Talk about shirking responsibilities! Known as parasitic eggs, because Mom will deposit her egg in the nest of another bird, typically with at least 2 eggs already laid. She then flies off leaving full responsibility for upbringing to the unsuspecting parents.

    Imagine trying to raise a baby who has grown twice the size of yourself. Just picture that for a moment. Other nestlings in the group barely have a chance at survival as the large cowbird baby hogs most of the food. This actually happens often- to wrens, bluebirds, chickadees, tree swallows and others. Some birds recognize the foreign egg and may abandon the nest or remove the egg. Most birds are unaware an imposter is looming, and end up raising the ridiculously large intruder to the detriment of their own nestlings.

    It’s the natural instinct to thrive, though cowbirds won’t be bothered raising their own. Also considered nomadic, they tend to follow livestock herds for the abundant insects, their habitat being open grasslands and meadows which are far away from most nesting spots.

    Cowbirds are native (unlike house sparrows or starlings) and are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty, thus it’s illegal in most cases to remove the egg. Sometimes permits are issued to bluebird monitors and others when circumstances warrant.  This is just one good reason for using correctly proportioned birdhouses. Nix the houses with really large entries, they do no favors to the birds you’re trying to attract. Avoid feeding birdseed containing millet as the tiny round seed tends to attract cowbirds. Most birds will flick this filler seed out of your feeder and onto the ground anyway.

    Cowbirds will drop eggs into others' birdhousesA bit smaller than blackbirds, cowbirds have brown heads. To view they gray female or juvenile cowbirds- check sialis.org for more informtion.

    And should you like to become a really, really good landlord- monitoring nests actually helps backyard birds thrive. Head over to Sialis.org where you’ll find a wealth of information and any question answered on hosting bluebirds and all native cavity nesting birds (those who use birdhouses).

    Photos courtesy of Sialis.org

  • Barn Swallow Nest Cups,  Bird Houses,  Uncategorized

    Barn Swallow Nest Cups are Back!

    Barn Swallow Nesting in CupsLike hummingbirds, barn swallows will soon be returning to previous nesting areas (and new ones too). The behavior is akin to a faithfulness or loyalty to favorable locations from previous seasons.

    Since the birds are extremely beneficial to have around the yard, gardens and barns for natural pest control, you can easily entice them with our barn swallow nest cups.

    Handmade set of wooden nesting cups closely resemble a barn swallows’ own digs! Simple to hang, they’re best placed up high near roof lines or eaves and most definitely sheltered from the elements.

    Do they really work? You bet! Just check out some of the on-page reviews  over the years. And especially Leda’s testimonial with pictures for living proof!

    Swallows adore the sturdy artificial home and folks are thrilled as the nest cups allow the birds to be coaxed from inconvenient nest spots- a common occurrence around stables or barns. Nine times out of ten, the birds will use the cups for their second brood… and return next year to use them again.

    Don’t be too surprised if an Eastern phoebe takes up residence either… they like the nest cups too!

  • Bluebird Houses,  Uncategorized

    Now’s the Time for Bluebird Houses!

    Eastern Bluebirds are house huntingThey’ve started already, in the Southeast and further North, lots of folks are reporting first nests and first eggs laid in their bluebird houses. It’s one sign of springs’ arrival… bluebirds are house hunting!

    Bluebird landlords (or folks who monitor bluebird houses) are eagerly awaiting the first clutches. Weather can be a tricky factor with late winter/early spring broods as natural food is still scarce. Bluebirds’ diets may be supplemented with meal worms, suet, shelled peanuts and sunflower hearts to help brooding birds cope with frigid or extremely wet weather.

    Recycled Plastic Bluebird House is NABS ApprovedFind the most handsome bluebird houses for all tastes, most are approved by the North American Bluebird Society (NABS). A house with side door makes for easy monitoring, as does the famous Gilbertson Nest Box.

    High quality and USA made, find durable cedar, recycled plastic (or poly-lumber) and stunning vinyl bluebird houses with copper roofs. Standing the test of time, bluebirds will return to these fine digs year after year should fledges be successful.

    Claimed this one with first strawsYes… monitoring is highly recommended to help keep bluebirds safe.

    No… you won’t disturb them if you tap on the birdhouse first, steer clear of busy feeding times (dawn and dusk) and especially refrain prior to fledge time (about 19 days after hatching). The latter may scare babies into an early fledge for which they are not fully prepared.

    Check out the website Silais.org for a wealth of information on bluebirds and other native cavity-nesting birds. Every question will be answered on this addictive site!

    If you don’t have a blue bird house up yet… don’t fret. But now’s the time! Blues will brood two, three and sometimes even four clutches per season. Open space is best with tress or fence line nearby for bluebirds to perch, hunt insects and guard their nests. Fresh water in a birdbath always entices feathered friends too!
    So what are you waiting for? It’s time to get your bluebird house on!

    Papa Bluebird feeds nest of 5 babies

    Buebird house is the first one claimed every year

  • Uncategorized,  Vinyl with Copper Roof Birdhouses

    Think Vinyl Birdhouse-Feeder for Valentines!

    Best Valentine Gift- Vinyl Birdhouse-FeederHappy Valentine's Day and Best Gift for Nature Lover

    Love Birds? Us too!

    As in do you love wild birds? Vinyl birdhouses-feeders make awesome gifts… for countless reasons.

    Vinyl Birdhouse-feederFirst, they look like wood. Some folks have even insisted they are not PVC or vinyl! Along with the solid copper roof (no metal over plywood) these vinyl birdhouse-feeders are guaranteed for life. It’s a one-time investment that brings birds and much joy indefinitely. Oh yeah… and curb appeal too, they’re quite handsome in the landscape!

    Second, there’s a wide range from which to choose. Bird Feeder or Birdhouse, which is best? Feeders will see more activity on a daily basis… but they must be maintained. Part of the beauty in these vinyl bird feeders is ease of cleaning. For a more thorough cleaning, simply slide the feeder off of the posVinyl Birdhouse-feeder in hanging, large capacity designt and take your garden hose directly to it for a good cleaning. Birdhouses on the other hand, only require nest removal after babies have fledged. Another major advantage is that vinyl is non-porous. This means mold and bacteria will not settle into cracks and crevices as it does with wooden feeders. Aside from the traditional Gazebo feeder which is post-mounted, there’s a hanging style with large capacity hopper. This allows for more bird-watching time and less filling the feeder.

    Two roof options are lacquered copper- which remains bright & shiny for about 4 to 5 years before weathering to a dark/aged finish. Think copper trim on a real house and how that looks dark after a few years. Patina finish is an acid wash applied with heat and remains an earthy and mottled blueish-green color.

    From small (bluebird houses) to extremely large (martin birdhouse) and in between size dovecotes… the range offers something for everyone. Birdhouse-feeders are gifts with purpose. What they give us back is simply intangible. The nature connection alone has the ability to remove daily chaos and lift the spirit. To take in nature- even from the comfort of your own home is awesome gift for your Valentine… or even yourself 🙂

    May you be showered with love (and feathered friends) this Valentine’s Day and always.

    Use code FH10 to nab $20 off vinyl birdhouse-feeders. They ship for zip too!

  • Bird Houses,  Uncategorized,  Unique Birdhouses

    Gift Guide for Nature Lovers: Best Birdhouses, Bird Feeders & Yard Art

    Nature-Lovers Gift Guide- Birdhouses, Feeders & Yard ArtEarly Birds really do catch the best selection!

    Check this year’s gift guide for handmade birdhouses, bird feeders and one-of-a-kind gifts for all nature lovers.

    12 themes with 3 suggestions for each, find cool yard art, recycled metal and more ideas for thoughtful and lasting gifts… for non-birders too.

    Birdhouses, bird feeders and birdbaths are gifts with purpose, providing an unplugged connection with nature for the recipient and helping to sustain wild birds with habitat. Gifts of nature are always a win-win and there’s never a worry of the dreaded re-gifting!

    Blackbird Friday Starts Now!

    Nab 10% off and get a free thistle sock… a great stocking stuffer that Goldfinches and others adore)

    Thru Monday 11/27 11:59 PM, EST
    Use Code Sox

    And a Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours!

     

  • Bird Houses,  Edible Birdhouse,  Uncategorized

    Edible Birdhouses are Back for Holiday!

    Birdies Bed and Breakfast Edible BirdhouseYa just can’t go wrong with two gifts in one that birds love. Not to mention that edible birdhouses also put a smile on the recipient’s face!

    From the heartland USA made, premium quality seeds coat these fun and festive birdhouse-feeder delights. More than just a pretty little whimsy, underneath is a real wooden bird house that serves as nesting spot and winter roost once seed is consumed.

    The Bed & Breakfast Chalet or Wren Casita will see lots of winter feeding, and then host many successful broods over the years!Encourage nesting in your edible birdhouse once the seed'd gone

    To get the most from any edible birdhouse:

    For use as a feeder: Best to hang in a sheltered area- away from squirrels and the elements. A weather guard or squirrel baffle is ideal, allowing it to feed more birds over a longer period of time.

    Once the seed is consumed: The birdhouse may be stained, painted, or left natural. Simply hang from a branch in a quiet area to provide songbirds the perfect nest site. During the “off-season”, they offer swell roosting spots too.

    A win-win holiday gift for any backyard birder or nature buff, edible birdhouses simply rock for their fun character and functionality. The birds will thank you too!

  • Bird Houses,  Dovecote Birdhouse,  Uncategorized

    Opt for Dovecote Birdhouses that Really Lasts

    Wooden Dovecote Birdhouses will deteriorateSay it ain’t so?

    That majestic dovecote birdhouse has seen better days. It now sites like an eyesore, rotted and crumbling. The only thing remaining intact is the beautiful copper roof.

    Sad but true, in all cases wood eventually succumbs to weather. Our dovecotes are meticulously crafted of vinyl/PVC although they look like wood.

    Folks think of vinyl as cheesy, slick-looking plastic… but it’s the furthest thing from the truth. Over the years, some customers have even had concerns they’d received a wooden birdhouse- when in fact it was a vinyl dovecote!

    But do the birds use these birdhouses?

    You bet! This male Eastern Bluebird is actually feeding mealworms to nestlings. How do we know this? The smaller dovecote happens to be our own! Installed about 6 years ago in an open area, it’s hosted many successful broods over the years. Yes, the copper roof could use a cleaning which simply entails a soft cloth, gentle soap and water… and time!

    Older Dovecote birdhouse with patina copper roofAfter these babies fledged, nest clean-out was in order. Climbing up and lifting the roof revealed that three other old nests had hosted chickadees, nuthatches and a prior bluebird family.

    Dovecote Birdhouse with Copper Roof When making an investment in your landscape, it’s a good idea to opt for quality, and something that carries a guarantee is always best.

    Stunning copper roof dovecote birdhouses are USA made and made to last a lifetime. Wood is never used in their construction, neither on finials nor decorative brackets. This means deterioration simply won’t occur because the material is inert. Resisting insect damage, the dovecotes will never warp, rot or peel as wood behaves.

    Real estate’s tough out there! Consider Fall Spruce-Up and housong the birds at the same time 🙂

     

     

  • Copper Roof Birdhouse,  Uncategorized

    Copper Roof Birdhouses for Earth Day- No Trees Please

    Earth Day Tidbit: No trees cut for these birdhouses or feeders

    To celebrate Earth Day, here’s a few cool birdhouses & feeders that  don’t require cutting down trees… we’d much rather save the trees for birds!

     

    Copper Roof Bird Feeder is vinyl that looks like woodCopper and Vinyl Birdhouses with wood-like texture

     

    The real beauty lies in the textured vinyl because it looks like wood. Many folks do prefer a natural look in the garden, and our copper roof birdhouses and feeders really do pass for wood. In fact, some past customers have insisted they received a wooden bird house!

    Vinyl, poly-lumber and recycled plastics have numerous advantages over traditional wood when it comes to birdhouses and feeders.

    Wood is good but it will always weather. These man-made materials are inert, in other words, they’re impervious to the elements and to insect damage. They will never crack, split or rot, and there’s no maintenance (except for regular cleaning of bird feeders). A soapy rag and forceful spray from the garden hose will cleanup environmental grime in a snap, leaving the house or feeder looking new again.

    The inside non-porous texture is much healthier for local birds in the yard because mold and bacteria can’t settle into cracks and crevices as it typically does with wood. It also makes cleaning much easier and more effective.

    Color is integrated with materials so scratches, dings or dents are barely noticeable. Recycled plastic or poly-lumber helps keep plastics out of landfills. One manufacturer uses labels saying how many milk jugs it took to make the item.

    Recycled and Reclaimed Wood Church BirdhousesOf course there will always be wood birdhouses too, but the trend has shifted to salvaged, found, vintage and reclaimed wood from barns and other structures. These unique birdhouses are usually handmade by artisans with a passion for birds, with each piece possessing an individual character and charm.

    Many styles are even one-of-a-kinds. Birds love them too and will be quite happy calling these places home to raise a brood or two!

    Happy Earth Day… time to go get out and garden!

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