• Bluebird Feeders,  Fruit, Jelly & Mealworm Feeders,  Mealworm Feeder,  Uncategorized

    Confessions from the Mealworm Feeder

    mealworm feederAddiction can be a terrible thing… and I fear that feeding worms has actually become one!

    So the worms are meant for this guy, his spouse and kids. Okay, the chickadees can have some, the titmice can too because they have nestlings to feed. Brown headed nuthatches stick around their box long after babies have fledged, they’re too much and may need a permanent address? For the first time phoebe finally has a family (that I’ve actually seen anyway) so of course they must take turns at the mealworm feeder – may you grow strong and thrive little phoebes!

    Cardinals won’t touch worms… until they have babies to feed. The catbirds are simply out of hand, wish they’d just stick to the grape jelly!  Have you ever seen 20,000 meal worms in a plastic shoe box heading for dormancy in the fridge? It’s become the norm as live worms cost less when buying in bulk. The worms aren’t bad, but the overnight shipping can kill ya!mealworm feeder

    Using this open dish as one of the mealworm feeders is really just asking for it, but babies can’t figure out the enclosed bluebird feeders, or jail type ones with open grid cage. Carolina wrens certainly can, they’re always the first to figure out any new feeder containing mealies!

    mealworm feederScreen feeders are nice and easy to use for humans and birds alike… but the worms crawl out! Anything with texture or tooth worms can grip allows cling and crawl action! No worries, anyone who drops to the ground meets their fate by a robin or thrasher just waiting below for the great escape!

    So the addiction? The grower must think I eat worms myself, the quantity has now increased to 25,000 worms a pop… and this is every four weeks or so. And I wonder why I’m broke?

  • Bluebird Feeders,  Fruit, Jelly & Mealworm Feeders,  Mealworm Feeder,  Uncategorized

    Bitter Morning’s Breakfast Menu with Extra Goods for the Mealworm Feeder!

    Rehydrated and live mealies ready for the mealworm feeder!The birdie menu was heavy with special treats today as frigid temperatures almost did my own hands in while feeding! Fingers actually stinging, they had to be warmed by the vent to feel them again. You may say ha… it’s Atlanta and not that bad… wanna bet?

    A balmy 5 degrees right now, there’s no chance of leaving the mealworm feeder filled for dawn… the poor little mealies will freeze. That’s what happened last night 🙁

    Actually, this is a pretty normal AM feeding, because if there’s too much food out, the nasty starlings hog it all, so daily rations are fed twice instead. Plus everything’s freezing right now.

    Not an ad for Peter Pan either, this is absolutely the normal routine, (for the birdhouse chick anyway) just happen to snap a photo of it today.

    So, what exactly does this backyard bird fanatic feed? From right to left, here goes:

    • Finch mix, consisting of finely chopped sunflower and thistle.  Lots of goldfinches, just not gold right now.
    • Small cup of live worms for the new enclosed mealworn feeder… take that starlings! Carolina wrens are usually first to figure out these feeders.
    • Large cup of cardinal mix for the platform feeder.
    • Large cup of critter mix for the squirrels and a few other birds.
    • Large cup of sunflower hearts/shelled peanut mix for platform feeder #2.
    • Live worms for two hanging dish-style mealworm feeders. Meant for the bluebird pair and eastern phoebe, but many others partake.
    • Sweet corn squirrel log, which is equal to about 12ears of regular corn cobs. These must be tightened up every few days as our crafty critters have managed to steal them from time to time!
    • Small cup of bluebird banquet, suet-like mixture that’s easy to make. Check our site (under birding resources) for this recipe and more.
    • Peanut butter, slapped right on tree bark is great for squirrels and birds. High in fat and protein, these extra calories provide energy needed to stay warm.
    • Re-hydrated meal worms for yet another dish-style feeder. Boiling water added to dry worms , steep and drain.
    • Bark Butter and suet slice for the woodpecker feeder.
    • Note the heated bath behind the food, and the cord running across the yard for heated bath #2 of five. Too many feeders to sAlthough migratory birds have moved on, resident birds benefit from supplemental feedering and a fresh water sourcehow pics, let’s just say there’s a good mix!

    Seriously… who would make up this stuff? We spend a lot of time fussing over our birds – but it’s so worth having them around. It was so cold today that the squirrels didn’t even venture out until late afternoon.

    Say you have only one bird feeder, that’s perfect too, just remember the water! Birds need a fresh water source even in the coldest weather. As far as Mr. Arctic Mass, you are not welcome in the South, so please go home now!

  • Bird Feeders,  Fruit, Jelly & Mealworm Feeders,  Uncategorized,  Wild Bird Feeders

    These Wild Bird Feeders are Far From Ordinary Angels

    A gift guide for wild bird feedersGive an angel this holiday season, one that’s amusing and functional!

    Definitely not the ordinary angel statue, these wild bird feeders  are downright fun. Angel Cats are pin or staked feeders for offering fruit, suet or seed balls. There’s even an orange tabby who’s equally adorable.

    Rustic wings are adjustable, with three perches on both front and back for bird’s dining comfort, complete with metal loop for easy hanging. It’s perfect for any feline lover and is sure to bring some big smiles… we know the birds will love this one too!

    A totally different style for offering birdseed, the other one’s actually dubbed “Garden Angel Bird Feeder”.

    Fruit and Suet Wild Bird Feeder is a true angel for holiday gifting!

    angel feederIt’s a great design because unlike tray feeders, the top helps protect seed (and birds) from the elements. Accommodating most seed mixes, you can always opt for peanuts, suet chunks, even fruit in summer for more variety. In an antique bronze finish, this whimsical angel will surely delight anyone who feeds birds!

    The gift of birding is one that gives back, there’s just something about bird watching in your own backyard that takes away the daily chaos of life. It becomes addictive entertainment that’s good for the soul… and good for birds too!

     

  • Bird Feeders,  Fruit Bird Feeder,  Fruit, Jelly & Mealworm Feeders,  Live Meal Worms,  Mealworm Feeder,  Uncategorized

    live worms escaping your mealworm feeder?

    an open dish mealworm feeder accommodates a variety of treats for wild birdsA customer’s question grabbed our attention: “How do you keep the worms inside the mealworm feeder?”

    Tooth, texture… that’s what it’s all about here. If the surface of the feeder is not smooth as glass, the wiggly, crawly delights get hold and simply crawl right out! Now this is a huge advantage to ground feeding birds like robins – ours actually sit and wait below the mealworm feeder. But for bluebirds, chickadees, nuthatches, warblers, swallows and titmice, they have to swoop down to catch their worms if they’ve all crawled out.

    So what’s the point of using a hanging dish feeder if worms end up on the ground? Not much! If you’re feeding live worms, it’s best to use a feeder that has absolutely no texture on the inside surface. Worms will stay put longer, and while juveniles are learning to use feeders, this is helpful.

    An open dish type feeder will also accommodate a good variety of other treats to entice wild birds. Oranges used in this double-dish model have orioles flocking and teaching babies where the good stuff is! Suet chunks and peanuts are also good options for winter feeding.

    Smooth, plexi-glass meal worm feeders like this are available in staked, hanging and even pole-mounted options. They’re durable for year-round use and dishwasher safe. Birds can perch anywhere on the dish – making it easier to land and feed. The vertical hangers are long enough to use with a weather guard, or even a baffle should squirrels be a problem around your place.

    If you’re on the squeamish side and can’t bear the thought of live worms, birds will also go for dried worms. In fact they pack more protein per serving! Consider a dish style mealworm feeder this season… they work great for more than just worms!

     

  • Bird Feeders,  Fruit, Jelly & Mealworm Feeders,  Mealworm Feeder,  Uncategorized

    Master of Mimicry~A Cool Video from The Cornell Lab

    Catbird Mimicry~My Catbirds stealing worms from the mealworm feeder

     

    An extremely cool video from The Cornell Lab of Ornithology, one special catbird in California (which is rare in itself) puts on an extreme show. Known as a master of mimicry, over twenty calls are recorded, side by side with the originator…. even a frog!

    Pretty common in our parts during summer months, we had several resident catbirds hanging around the yard this season. Digging into suet and a jelly feeder–until the yellow jackets showed up, they then opted for worms meant for bluebirds! Crafty & smart, they’d wait and watch until the open dish melworm feeder came alive once again.

    Actually it became obnoxious, as the worms were for the baby bluebirds! But there were breeding pairs nearby and catbird fledges were soon at the feeder too. It sure was a busy season, likely because of diminished food sources and the horrid drought. Two leaf misters ran daily, and nine birdbaths were maintained!  It was great having catbirds around, but good to see them move on as well.

    Check out the short video below for some excellent catbird knowledge!

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