Archive for the 'Bats & Butterflies' Category

October is National Bat Appreciation and Raptor Month


October 14, 2017
posted by birdhouse chick @ 8:12 pm

Celebrate Bats & Owls as October recognizes both cool species!

Bat Appreciation Month- install a bat house this monthThere couldn’t be a more fitting time of year to think about bats! The great thing is that bat houses and owl boxes help both species thrive, and they’ll take you up on cozy digs if offered in suitable habitat.

Beneficial to have around your property for rodent and insect control, bats and owls could use a helping hand as their natural habitats continue to shrink.

If you’ve ever climbed up in the attic to find a bat or two clinging to the vent screen… it can be a bit unnerving! But the flying mammals are fairly harmless and sadly, quite misunderstood. Popular at Halloween for their cryptic character, the Organization for Bat Conservation (OBC) has been established to educate and inspire people to save bats.

Multi-Chamber Bat House hosts hundreds of bats daily

Installing a bat house is advantageous as these not-so mysterious creatures consume thousands of insects nightly, not to mention that as pollinators, bats help gardens thrive. Cool factoid: Being the sole pollinator of the agave plant, if it weren’t for bats there would be no tequila! Bat boxes are available from single- to 5-chambers, in durable cedar or recycled plastic.

WHHHOOOOO would’ve thunk it?

Saw-whet Owlets in their cozy owl house

Owls seize every opportunity to find shelter and food sources wherever possible. When it comes to habitat, owls are versatile as they reside in wooded areas (most common), rain forests, grasslands, and open prairie. As long as owls are able to stake claim to their own territory and hide from predators during the day, they are survivors.

The common misunderstanding is that owls live in tree-tops but the reality is, they live in tree trunks, abandoned structures and barn rafters. Some live in shrubs and bushes where you would never think to look for them. Often, these birds are not found high off the ground as many people believe. Owls will use a suitable hollowed out log or opening in a tree for nesting, bud sadly dead trees and snags are often discarded by land owners.

Truth be told is that owls need not be perched up high to find their prey. They’ll hunt right from their nest location or owl house instead of using a perch like most birds.  Some owl species like the Great Horned- will not start a new nest, instead claiming nests of other raptors or Common Ravens that have been left behind. Barn Owls are known to roost year-round in their houses, so clean-out is best during non-breeding months in January/February.

Because owls are an isolating and territorial species, it’s believed that habitat loss could become critical for future survival. Even though they’re highly adaptable, owls like other wildlife are limited in what they can do without their natural habitat.

Interested in learning more to assist these majestic raptors? Install a species-specific owl house to offer cozy habitat for nesting and roosting.

Add a Bee or Butterfly Feeder & Help Pollinators Thrive


September 26, 2017
posted by birdhouse chick @ 10:29 am

Natural Butterfly Feeder“I am currently turning my weedy flower garden into a bird station with flowers for pollinators! (no more weeds!) I am very excited about my project and will have it completed by next Spring. So I am having fun perusing your website and procuring items to begin installation after Winter. For now, I’m preparing soil and tweaking my plans. Thanks for your wonderful shop! ”  ~Nancy

The note above was recently sent in by a customer and  friend… it’s simply music to our ears! Consider adding a bee or butterfly feeder to help all pollinators and to ease the great monarch migration in fall.

Fall plantings beyond your traditional mum varieties will extend your garden’s blooming season and even better yet, continue to attract butterflies! By choosing some of these beautiful, fall blooming plans in your garden, you’ll enjoy an abundance of blooms and continue to attract butterflies.

Even though we see a plethora of butterflies in spring and summer months surrounding our flowers, there are still many that have a need for nectar in the fall. Some varieties have migration paths as long as thousands of miles, so good nectar sources are needed along the way. Many butterflies are not migratory and continue searching for nourishment locally. Try your hand at some of these fall plantings for an additional bonus of butterflies to your garden!

Bee and Butterfly Feeder
Think red, yellow, pink, purple and other bright colors as you design your garden’s artistic palette of blooms for fall. Many flowers attract butterflies and are suitable for almost any garden. Consider plants that can withstand the season’s first or second frost. Some recommended plantings are:

  • Sedums: Easy to grow plants in gravelly soil in full sun with decent drainage.
    Pink and Purple Asters: When sheared in the spring can produce a mound of pleasing, compact loads of daisy-like blooms
  • Salvia: Continue to bloom through the first hard frost come in many varieties and produce tubular blossoms to attract swallowtails, fritillaries, and other butterflies
  • Latana: A favorite of butterflies that blooms in the summer until a hard, killing frost.
  • Penta: A true love of the butterfly! Colors are typically bright red and work well in beds, borders, or in pots on a patio
    Dark Night
  • Bluebears: Drought-tolerant for those of you living in dryer regions. Produces clusters of deep-blue flowers and typically grows 3 to 4 feet tall.

Remember, these are just a few varieties of fall bloomers to get you started! Consider fall planting choices for beauty-enhancing blooms and the additional benefit of nourishment for our butterfly friends!

Grandpa’s Pet Bat Didn’t use a Bat House


October 2, 2016
posted by birdhouse chick @ 10:49 am

flying batThey’re creepy and they’re kooky, mysterious and spooky… remember the theme song? Maybe old enough like us to mix them up with the family residing at 1313 Mockingbird Lane.

It was Grandpa from the Munster’s who had the pet bat! Only showing him in flight, I don’t recall ever seeing his bat house, can you remember his name? Regardless, both of those theme songs keep replaying in the brain.

On a more serious note, it’s believed that about 44% of bees have perished this year from pesticide poisoning, which is really scary! Like the birds & bees, bats are also major pollinators of tropical plants and fruit, they’re considered the night shift pollinators.

Thankfully, more folks are tuning into the needs of these friendly flying mammals with fur. Offering bat houses for roosting actually helps promote pollination. Aside from the thousand of insects consumed nightly, pollination is a huge draw. Especially for the agave plant, because without it- there would be no tequila!

Cedar Bat HouseFrom bat house kits and large capacity bat houses to artisan crafted bat shelters, there’s now a great variety of ways to offer proper roosting spots.

Materials vary from recycled plastic and cedar to aged barn wood for a more rustic appeal. There’s even several plans available online to build your own.

It may prove difficult at first to attract them, residing near a pond or lake greatly increase chances of occupancy. Recommended height is 12 to 15 feet, with a clear pathway to entry.

Facing SE or SW allows the bat house to receive maximum sun exposure for retained heat. Structures of brick, stone or wood are ideal mounting surfaces as they also retain heat. Metal- not so much. A pole may be easiest as the shelter can be attached while still on the ground, and then erected with bat house already secured.

Either way, bat houses are definitely something worth looking into. With holiday approaching they’d make an excellent gift for the nature-lover on your list.

And Grandpa’s bat… Igor, of course!cathedral bat house

 

 

Fancy Butterfly Feeders not Required


September 9, 2016
posted by birdhouse chick @ 12:49 pm

Discarded fruit makes awesome butterfly feeders

Migratory winged ones are on the move!

It’s an awesome time of year to catch the action not only of feathered friends- but butterflies too!

Although we’ve nary seen a monarch this year (so very sad) a few other butterfly species have been prevalent. Several Swallowtails, Sulphurs and Viceroys to name a few. And even though we have a great selection on our website… they’re not coming to any fancy butterfly feeders.

A few alternative options to actual butterfly feeders:
•Discarded fruit- provided it’s not too far gone
•Nectar producing flowers- preferably native
•Leaf misters

These things absolutely work to entice the flying jewels! Leaf misters offer a gentle spray which butterflies adore, you can see them dance and flit through the fine mist. In fact, it’s almost mesmerizing! Their own personal spa, leaf misters also have gardens growing lush. Use these year after year, ours are going on their 10th season!

Discarded fruit is a no-brainer; from oranges, to melons, pears, apples and bananas, place fruit on a deck rail, plate, or anywhere near flowers where you’ve seen the least bit of butterfly activity.

And the flowers? We prefer native perennials. Again, you’ll get year after year of blooms and activity. Lantana is is one of the more common plants in the southeast, in fact it’s almost invasive! Butterfly or milk weed is also a popular host plant. Pollination Trifecta in this video with hummingbird, bees and butterflies on one plant!

Plan next spring with a few vegetables specifically for butterfly host plants; dill, fennel and parsley are ideal plants to host black swallowtails, and milkweed is a must for monarch caterpillars!

Another easy DIY is creating a waterless pond for butterflies to warm in the sun. Simply place heat-aborbing rocks (so they’re flat) in a sunny spot, add sand and salt and keep moist. You may wish to line the area first with plastic to keep salt out of soil. Sort of a crude version of the popular butterfly puddlers.butterfly puddler

And one last tip on feeding butterflies: They do not drink from an open water source. When using butterfly feeders like this staked one below, place a sponge in the center to soak up nectar. This acts as a wick where butterflies draw nectar like they do in nature from flowers.

Staked Butterfly Feeder

 

 

Ok, maybe we’re wrong, the really really last tip: Stop using chemicals like pesticides, fertilizers and herbicides. Natural is the new landscape, manicured, pristine lawns and gardens are a thing of the past. Do it for butterflies, do it for all pollinators, most of all… do it for the human race!

Butterfly Feeders for Unique Garden Accents and Monarchs


July 11, 2015
posted by birdhouse chick @ 9:02 pm

Butterfly Feeder/Bath on Tall StakeBuzz about the Monarch’s dwindling population is more than justified. You may have heard about it, but if not check this fact: Since the mid-90’s their decline has reached 90% from the 20-year average. What’s this mean in terms of real numbers? Swap monarchs for people for a second, every person in the US would be gone except for those living in just two states!

One of the biggest reasons for their decline is believed to be the disappearance of milkweed- the Monarch caterpillar’s only food source, and also the only plant on which Monarchs will lay their eggs. To name a few other culprits; urban sprawl, extreme weather, new farming practices and illegal logging in the butterflies’ winter habitat in Mexico.

Offering suitable habitat and butterfly feeders really does help the local Monarch population. Don’t bother with houses… they don’t use them! Both can be fantastic and unique garden accents – with feeders being much more useful. Butterflies also adore leaf misters, set one up near lantana or any other nectar-producing plant and you’re bound to see some winged action!

The butterfly feeders above are handmade, blown glass flowers on a 36-inch stake. They’re versatile for nectar or fruit, and for songbirds too. The hanging butterfly feeder below has been tested and approved by butterfly experts. A special combination of wicks and tubes mimic real flower blossoms, the design and color attracts butterflies and the nectar reservoir size is ideal to minimize spoilage.hanging butterfly feeder in use

This season, Swallowtails have been spotted in our butterfly habitat, but no Monarchs yet 🙁 Still a few months for their presence in the southeast… we’ll continue to feed and keep watch for the winged wonders!Butterfly getting nectar from flowers  Butterfly habitat with leaf mister

Use Puddlers as Butterfly Feeders too!


December 3, 2014
posted by birdhouse chick @ 1:28 pm

Puddlers are versatile as butterfly feedersGift idea #22: Prompt a butterfly haven

What gardener or birding enthusiast doesn’t adore butterflies? If they’re fairly new to either hobby, the first point of concern is habitat, even if they happen to be seasoned vets… habitat is always key in luring any winged wonders to the garden!

Food, water and shelter simply equal habitat, not too complicated at all. When landscaping a new home, or enhancing existing gardens, native plants are always the best choice, for wildlife and the home-owner. As food sources and as shelter, they’re more likely to thrive in local soils. Nectar-producing flowers (including many of the showy annuals) are really butterfly feeders themselves.Staked glass butterfly feeders offer great versatility

Butterfly houses? Although they make for stunning garden accents with an almost magical appeal… we’re not convinced butterflies actually use them! But another cool butterfly feeder is hand-blown and home grown right here in Georgia. On a tall stake, these large glass flowers offer versatility for feeding nectar as well. Birds will use them as sippers with fresh water, and even suet or jelly for migratory friends works great! Best of all, these are lovely in the garden whether butterflies are present or not!

Creating those spaces for butterflies with water and places to “warm in the sun” is the absolute equivalent to visiting the spa! Leaf misters are a major attraction, Adding a leaf mister near butterfly feeders entices winged wondersand birds love them too! Puddlers are perfect as feeders using over ripe fruit or the secret sauce recipe on the tag accompanying them. As an inviting bath for butterflies, they’re simple to use.

Handcrafted weather-proof stoneware, the decorative plaque-like puddlers are safe in the garden year-round, adding a nice touch even when flying jewels are absent. A great gift for any nature buff, ours come with a book on butterfly gardening for ideas and inspiration on creating the ultimate habitat!

Newest Bat Houses are Vinyl/PVC


July 28, 2014
posted by birdhouse chick @ 9:45 am

New vinyl bat houses stand up to the elementsSmart innovations (made in the USA) using durable materials means better quality, especially for items that remain outdoors. For seven years, we’ve had phenomenal feedback on all of our vinyl birdhouses and feeders – in fact some folks even thought they were made from wood!

With the popularity of natural insect control, and the increasing aversion to pesticides (thank goodness), bat houses have become a top preference for zapping those blood-sucking, nasty insects!

This brand new bat shelter with many a creature comfort will entice friendly brown bats and keep them roosting around your place. One tiny single bat can eat more than 1000 mosquitoes per night, now multiply that by 65, which is the approximate capacity here.

Made in the USA, the new vinyl design is completely impervious weather… will not crack, warp, split or mildew. The light color actually helps cool the box and stabilize inside temperatures during warm summer months. That’s important stuff if you’re a bat! It also blends well with the lighter colors of exterior paint on many homes – and that’s important stuff to people, it won’t stick out like a sore thumb!

Mounting height should be at least 15 ft. from the ground, on any structure, tree, or 4×4 post. Be sure entry is free and clear of any limbs or branches which might impede landing. It may take a little time for bats to discover their new digs, but if they already reside in your area, occupancy could be immediate. Having water nearby is more appealing to them; as in a creek, lake, stream or pond. Not a requirement, but more suitable habitat.

So vow to quit the bug zappers and chemicals this year, it’s far better for everyone’s health and the environment too. Try a bat house and entice these friendly, furry little mammals to your yard!

 

 

Naturally Man Made Butterfly Feeders, huh?


June 3, 2014
posted by birdhouse chick @ 5:34 pm

butterfly feeders A few, yes there were actually three or four butterflies spotted in the yard last month. Because winter dragged it’s sorry butt into spring again this year, there really wasn’t anything blooming yet from where butterflies could draw nectar. Offering leaf misters through summer (which butterflies love), we’re really not ones to offer butterfly feeders, because there’s enough to maintain in our wildlife habitat already!

Quick… run to the store for plants in bloom so the flying gems might have something to eat and decide to stick around! This hibiscus did nicely, as well as this orange tube thingbutterfly feeders… I couldn’t tell you the name, but most tube-shape flowers are nectar producers (good to know).

Enter a local artisan and glass blower spotted at a craft show. Hhmmm? Can you make us some glass flowers and put them on a tall stake? We want to use them in the garden as butterfly feeders! After a few weeks and some back & forth… ta-dah!

Some of the most beautiful staked glass butterfly feeders we’d ever seen, they came out awesome! The pics don’t really do them any justice, because sunlight accents the colors and makes them sparkle. butterfly-feedersOn a 36-inch stake, they’re perfect anywhere in the garden, and are quite versatile for birds too.

Complete with a piece of sea sponge which acts like a wick, butterflies can draw nectar naturally as they do from flowers. Fill it with water as a sipper for any songbird, or a few spoonfuls of grape jelly for orioles, cat birds and other migratory birds. You can even do suet chunks or seed in winter for your resident fliers.

Hand-blown glass and locally made ensure these feeders are unique and high quality, and we can promise if the habitat is right, both butterflies and birds will be winging their way right to them!

Attract Them and Offer Roosts with Bat Houses


May 22, 2014
posted by birdhouse chick @ 2:10 am

Bat HousesThey make some cool shelters these days, from vintage to Victorian, recycled plastic, even kits to build your own bat houses. You can try your luck at attracting bats without a big investment. But why would anyone want to attract them? One word – beneficial would sum it up best!

Bats are major pollinators and seed spreaders. Natural insect control is another huge advantage to hosting these friendly mammals (yes, they’re mammals). Even small bat colonies will consume thousands of mosquitoes and other pests nightly.

Habitat plays a key role in attracting any friendly fliers to your place. This holds true for butterflies, hummingbirds and songbirds too. If pesticides are being used, stop! They’re harmful to the to the environment, wildlife and the ecosystem in general. Pristine, manicured lawns are becoming passe, more naturalized areas are in style. This doesn’t mean jungle… it involves use of native plants, naturalized beds, and varied habitat.

You can attract bats by offering places for them to roost (other than your attic vents). Bat houses needn’t be plain square boxes, but stylish shelters that complement the landscape. The two shown are handcrafted in the USA, and made from solid cypress.bat houses

If water exists on your property, there’s a strong likelihood bats will use your shelters. Being near a creek, stream, or pond is preferable. They require a stable environment, steady temperatures within their roosts. Facing the houses south will allow full sun exposure to warm the boxes. Two bat houses are even better, facing them in different directions and allowing for varying temperatures. Leaving an outside light on at night may also assist in bringing bats to your place. As bugs swarm the light, bats will follow if they’re currently near your property.

Height is important when installing the houses as well. Some say 10 feet is sufficient, others claim 15-20 feet from the ground is best. Mount directly on a tree, structure or pole.

You can learn more about housing specs and hosting bats from The Organization for Bat Conservation.

Add a Ginko or Fern Near Butterfly Feeders


March 19, 2014
posted by birdhouse chick @ 1:21 pm

While nature produces the best butterfly feeders, other accessories will further entice them!Nobody’s thinking butterflies just yet, but it won’t be too long! With several migrations underway, monarchs, swallowtails and others will be arriving soon. Their numbers are way down which is alarming to scientists, pesticides and climate change being key factors.

If you’d like to have these pollinators gracing your garden, here’s a few simple things to consider:

•Call it quits and abandon the use of any pesticides and herbicides.

•Plant native flowers and shrubs to benefit the flying jewels. Two-part, for food and hosting the chrysalis. A simple search on the web will reveal an abundant list of options for your locale.

•Leaf misters are mighty appealing to butterflies. They’re simple to install and even portable, your garden will grow lush too as a result of the gentle spray of water!

•Add butterfly feeders, in the form of nectar producing flowers, over ripe fruit, or an actual feeder that offers nectar via wicks. The wicks re-create the way butterflies use their long middle antennae to draw nectar from flowers.

•Butterfly Houses? Not so much, but they do look awesome in the landscape!

•Try a stoneware butterfly puddler for a cozy place to warm themselves in the sun.

Aside from an artsy garden accent, they can be used as feeders or easily transformed into a waterless pond by adding some sand and salts. The Ginko is a new puddler available for 2014 that features a rich texture and natural color. Both styles are complete with instructions for best use.

The original fern puddler is still a favorite when placed near butterfly feeders butterfly feedersHelp these flying jewels by creating habitat to lure and keep them around. Your garden and the butterflies will thank you!

Now if it ever greens up, we’ll get a cool shot of the new one actually being used in the landscape!