Archive for the 'Peanut Feeders' Category

Peanut Bird Feeders that Rock


November 4, 2016
posted by birdhouse chick @ 3:52 am

Give birds peanuts… because variety is the spice of life!

whole peanut bird feeder for year-round useBe it shelled or whole peanuts, birds love them and for good reason. They pack a real punch for nutrition and likely for taste, but you’d have to ask a bird on that one.

Simply put, Calories = Energy, so especially for cold weather feeding, peanut bird feeders are always a good bet. That energy is what keeps birds warm overnight. Ever wonder why many resident birds feed from dawn till dusk? The goal is to store enough energy to make it through a frigid night.

The Wreath Peanut Feeder above is meant for whole peanuts, but it’s easy to pop a suet ball or two inside for more variety. The design is very bird-friendly and even lends itself for other options.

In early spring, it’s ideal for nesting materials. Start saving your pet’s hair from their brush now. Decorative mosses and feathers are also prime materials for nest construction by most of the usual suspects. Steer clear of dryer lint- though it may seem soft & fluffy, it contains synthetic material that’s just not found in a birds’ world.Peant Bird Feeder for Shelled Peanuts

Say you could do without the mess of peanuts in the shell? Opt for a feeder that’s made for shelled peanuts. Most of these will accommodate black oil sunflower seed so you can still change it up, enticing more birds to your place.

The large capacity mesh design offers lots of all-over feeding space. Most styles also lend themselves to doing the nest materials in spring. Adding suet may not work as well in shelled peanut bird feeders as there’s nothing to hold it at the outer wall for easy access – though you’ll likely be able to do black oil sunflower for variety.

Regardless if shelled, or peanuts in the shell, birds will flock for this tasty treat year-round. Expect woodpeckers, jays, titmice, chickadees, nuthatches, bluebirds and others at shelled peanuts. Expect squirrels at all peanut feeders… in which case a baffle is highly recommended 🙂

Super Sized Peanut Bird Feeders


October 12, 2015
posted by birdhouse chick @ 9:50 am

Whole Peanut Bird Feeder Basket SetLots of birds (and squirrels) adore whole peanuts, especially in colder weather- they pack a punch for higher nutritional value than seed alone. If you’d rather keep squirrels out of peanut bird feeders a baffle is highly recommended!

Ideal for feeding whole peanuts, this wire basket set is versatile for lots of other goodies too. Use these for suet, corn cobs, nesting materials in spring, and even fruit in summer for migratory birds. Use all 3 for peanuts and hang them in different spots around the yard to entice more feathered friends! They feature a long hanging chain with big hook for easy placement (plus enough chain length to accommodate a baffle). The locking lid will keep thieving paws out, and the solid roof helps protect goods from the elements.

There’s also a tube style stainless steel version for whole peanuts which offers an optional seed tray. Inviting more than clinging birds, jays and other can perch in comfort on the 10-inch tray while it helps to catch waste.Stainless Steel Whole Peanut Bird Feeder

It’s actually dubbed as a suet ball feeder, but the large openings are perfect for whole peanuts. So you can really offer a variety of treats in one feeder, mixing some suet chunks or balls between peanuts to delight many a species! Clingers like chickadees, nuthatches, titmice and woodpeckers love this stuff, as well as jays, bluebirds and cardinals (in winter), phoebes, warblers… and the list goes on!

Branch out from traditional feeders filled with boring birdseed and see who comes to visit? And as always, fresh water is key to bringing more birds to the garden. Even during frigid weather, songbirds will absolutely flock to a heated birdbath.

Whole or Shelled Nuts for Peanut Bird Feeders?


February 16, 2015
posted by birdhouse chick @ 1:10 pm

Happy blue jay perches at whole peanut bird feederDepends on who you’re looking to attract? Most clinging birds covet shelled peanuts, in fact almost all birds will go for them. But not all birds are clingers, classified by their ability to grasp a small surface (and their strong feet). Chickadees, nuthatches, woodpeckers and titmice for the most part are considered clingers. The term not to be confused with clingons from Star-Trek 🙂

Adding a tray to peanut bird feeders allows other birds to easily get the goods. Jays adore peanuts, warblers go for them in winter, as will most backyard birds during frigid weather. The tray is inviting, making landing and eating easier.Smaller peanut bird feeder with tray

Larger trays even catch waste from whole peanuts, which folks who could do without the waste might find more appealing. Although when feeding shelled peanuts… there’s really not much waste all. So that alone may influence what’s best to offer at your place! Many  shelled peanut feeders offer tray options-but should they not- a universal seed catcher is available to accommodate them.

If the waste from feeding birds is a big drawback, large adjustable seeduse bird seed trays at whole peanut bird feeders to minimize waste trays could be the answer. Attaching to almost any type of feeder, the large 16- or 30-inch diameter promises to catch anything that falls from the feeder. These also create a new feeding space with their large platform area. Peanuts pack a real punch in terms of nutritional value, especially in cold weather. They’re economical if purchased in bulk too. So don’t give up the ship due to the mess some peanut bird feeders may leave behind!

 

Welcome Fall with Shelled Peanut Bird Feeders


September 23, 2014
posted by birdhouse chick @ 10:59 pm

Happy Fall

Happy Autumnal Equinox!

Falling leaves and shorter days trigger birds and wildlife to do their survival thing! Migratory birds, butterflies and even insects are on the move southward to warmer winter digs. Many residents will start caching food stores for later retrieval-jays and nuthatches do this, even squirrels.Squirrels cache corn and nuts...even from peanut bird feeders Should you happen to feed the furry critters, adding peanuts to the mix serves them well in fall and winter. Even peanut butter smeared on corn cobs or a tree trunk is a happening treat!

A fantastic source of fat, calories and protein can be had from peanut bird feeders. The legumes pack a punch of a meal for optimal nutrition. Offering shelled peanuts reduces ground mess… in fact there’s no mess at all. Any morsel falling to the ground will go to good use!

With an array of styles, peanut feeders are a great choice for fall and winter feeding. Nuthatches, titmice, woodpeckers and chickadees will partake, even bluebirds sometimes go for shelled peanuts in cold weather.No ground waste using shelled peanuts in bird feeders

They can hang or pole-mount, have optional trays for perching, or offer an all-over feeding space for clinging birds. The spiral peanut feeders are awesome as opposed to traditional perches. They allow more birds to feed at once, and watching them run or hop the continuous perch is a trip! Birds seem to love these feeders, and there’s an optional 10-inch clear tray for additional perching space and catching shells.Spiral peanut bird feeders are a hoot to watch

Caged type feeders will typically keep squirrels out of your peanuts, while suet cages work great for trying whole peanuts. Lots of options for changing up treats with seasons!

So with the arrival of fall, a new feeder might just be in order for your resident birds. Unfortunately they’re saying this winter will be as bad as last 🙁

Fortunately, you can nab 10% off all bird feeders through the end of September! Use promo code MC10 at checkout… our thanks for feeding the birds 🙂

Do More with Peanut Bird Feeders


March 1, 2014
posted by birdhouse chick @ 2:57 am

peanut bird feeders and every other feedersit covered in snow at dawnJust a few short weeks (hopefully) and that dreary, brown, snow covered landscape will give way to lush new foliage… and it can’t come soon enough for many of us!

Feeders have been in full swing this winter with hungry birds braving the most frigid days seeking calories to keep warm. Every feeder’s seen its share of flying traffic through this most miserable season.

With bulbs forcing through, birds are already starting to nest in the southeast, we’ve already changed up two peanut bird feeders for another good use… nesting materials!

Any kind of feeder with wide openings works well. Because peanuts are still mighty beneficial to birds, using an extra suet cage is ideal for offering materials.Lots of uses for peanut bird feeders

Here’s one of the cool things about backyard birding. Not too much is cut in stone so to speak. You needn’t buy a full-fledged peanut bird feeder to offer peanuts, nor a complete nesting material kit to offer the materials. Here’s a cool recycled 3-in-1 feeder that perfect for suet, peanuts, nesting material or even fruit in summer. Just be creative and see what works best for your birds!Double Suet Feeder works for peanuts, nesting material and fruit in summer.

That same spring feeder offers peanuts, suet, nest material, and yes… fruit in summer. Oh yeah, and the nesting materials? You can do this one yourself! Cats or dogs? Save their hair (not such a good idea if fluffy or fido has been treated with flea & tick medication). Decorative mosses are another favorite, sphagnum or sheet moss, Spanish moss, coco fibers from old plant liners too. Just be sure they’re clean. Feathers are coveted as well for some species’ nests. Again, just be sure thee have been sanitized, and use light or natural colors in the mix.

Vow to do more with peanut bird fedeers this yearRecently cruising one of the video platforms, a big retailer’s video came up about nesting material. With lots of video views, “how dead wrong” is what came to mind. Cardinals don’t use those shelves, they nest in trees or shrubs. But I guess if you have no trees or shrubs they might use one? And they don’t use that cotton stuff either. Weed stems, twigs, bark, grasses and leaves are what make up cardinal nests in these parts… come on!

 

 

 

 

 

peanut bird feeders do more than nuts!


September 24, 2013
posted by birdhouse chick @ 12:47 am

Peanut Feeders are shown with nesting material, suet and fruit.Many peanut feeders also accommodate fruit and nesting material

 

 

 

 

 

 

If versatility is the name of the game, and multi-use is an appealing idea, then you can’t beat peanut bird feeders to fit the bill. Regardless of style, their coils, screens or grids offer spacious openings for whole or shelled nuts… and more!

High in protein and fat, peanuts  provide birds the extra calories needed in cooler weather and throughout migration periods. An energy-packed treat, they’re actually helpful to birds year-round. Right now you’ll find chickadees, titmice, woodpeckers and others caching these gems in tree cavities and other hiding places for later use. Sneaky nuthatches are often seen raiding the caches instead of eating at the feeders!

Seasonally, you can use these same feeders to entice feathered friends with nesting materials, fruit and even suet. Although suet can be messy, most peanut bird feeders are dishwasher safe. This architectural copper style accommodates whole or shelled peanuts, along with the above mentioned treats.Innovative and decorative styles prove peanut bird feeders anything but boring. Birds are able to enter like a fly-thru feeder or cling to the screen for a tasty treat.

Forget the boring tubes, peanut feeders come in all shapes and sizes to complement all spaces, and we’re pretty sure birds would approve of any of them!

peanut bird feeders also squirrel feeders


April 3, 2013
posted by birdhouse chick @ 3:00 pm

fun peanut feeders are versatile for more wild bird offerings That’s a red wreath peanut feeder. That photo was taken in or yard, so when it showed up on a famous auction site (without permission) we were sort of annoyed. That peanut bird feeder also appeared on our website about four years, prior to any distributor’s offering. Of course we wrote the description… where else would it come from? The peanut bird feeders were being sourced at a full-pop retail price from a local birding store! Why? It was something very unique at the time, and to keep it that way, we offered the item assembled, filled with peanuts, and ready to hang, most times including a few extra pounds of peanuts… for free. And the secret for easily filling it was included in our hand written cards.

Now, when placing it in the bird feeders category, we thought this would also make a great squirrel feeder since the critters are so fond of whole peanuts. Being metal, there’s nothing for them to chew on thus destroying the feeder. So… we said “feed birds or squirrels or both”. And you know what happened? Other sites started describing the same thing… in the exact same words. And all that’s ok, except when SE don’t recognize from where the content is originated.

Regardless of all that (sorry-just had to vent) the peanut wreath is a fun design that offers huge versatility. If you’d rather not have squirrels raiding your peanuts – simply add a baffle. The coil design is perfect for offering nest materials in early spring, as well as fruit in summer to attract migratory birds.

That’s about all we’ll say for now on these peanut bird feeders.

Groovy, Curvy Peanut Bird Feeders~for sunflower seed too


September 21, 2012
posted by birdhouse chick @ 12:43 pm

Handcrafted, Curved Screen Peanut Feeder offers all-over feeding spaceIt’s so perfect when any bird feeder does double-duty, as switching things up will entice new visitrs to your yard. Peanuts offer an awesome, high fat and high calorie meal for many species. Titmice, Nuthatches, Jays, Cardinals, Bluebirds in winter, and even more will delight as they dine at shelled peanut bird feeders.

Leaving no ground mess behind, shelled peanuts are easy to feed, and if purchased in bulk, they’re really not that expensive. This handcrafted shelled peanut feeder is a large capacity, all-over feeder. Meaning there’s four sides for birds to cling and eat simultaneously. No waiting around for an open perch, no moldy, yucky peanuts compressed at the bottom of the tube!

Durable and attractive, it’s cedar construction is made to last, enhancing any landscape for many seasons. This cool feeder can hang with the attached coated wire cable, and may also be pole-mounted. Word of caution: use a baffle, because squirrels love peanuts too! Accommodating black oil sunflower seed as well, this large capacity peanut feeder is definitely a keeper!

fun peanut bird feeders do more than peanuts


May 31, 2012
posted by birdhouse chick @ 12:39 am

fun peanut feeders are versatile for more wild bird offeringsSince variety is considered the spice of life, try offering birds something a little more exciting than just plain old seed. You’ll attract a broader range of species in the process too.

Peanuts! Jays, Nuthatches, chickadees, woodpeckers and more love peanuts. Shelled or whole, they’re a special treat packed with nutritional value for feathered friends – which makes them a great choice for winter feeding. Birds won’t mind them at all in summer though!

This fun wreath peanut feeder features a mod design resembling an old slinky. In powder coat metal, it won’t rust and squirrels can’t chew through it either. There’s a trick to filling this feeder because it takes two hands, so here’s a quick tip: Sit down, and brace the feeder between your legs. This allows for the two-handed action required for pouring them from the bag, otherwise peanuts end up all over the floor. Been there, and done that!

The cool thing about the wreath, or coil design is the options it affords for your birds. In summer, fruit is a perfect choice to attract migratory birds. Apple, pear, or orange slices, and even grapes are wonderful choices for cat birds, orioles, tanagers, woodpeckers and others.

Early spring is absolutely the best time for offering nesting materials too… and so simple with this peanut bird feeder! Bright cotton yarns, decorative mosses, feathers, and even pet hair are a few favorites that will encourage nest building around the yard. Just fill the wreath, pull some materials through to get started, and hang it from a branch where birds will see it. Don’t pack materials too tightly though. Should rain saturate them, you’ll want enough air to pass through enabling the materials to dry fairly quickly.

Even when using as a peanut feeder, you can still “mix it up” by adding suet balls or suet chunks in with peanuts. Birds will love it, and they’ll be back for more!

By the way, this photo was taken in our backyard, so when it shows up other places… please remember you saw it here first. This is how we ship them, assembled, filled and ready to go, with extra peanuts too!

peanut bird feeders in winter (and peanut butter)


January 11, 2012
posted by birdhouse chick @ 8:51 pm

peanut butter and peanut bird feeders are perfect for winter monthsIn our backyard there are more than enough bird feeders which accommodate many species! But when a cool feeder comes along… well, sometimes ya just can’t resist.

Although the woodpeckers, nuthatches, jays and more have they’re own peanut bird feeders, we’ve found that peanut butter is also huge hit in frigid weather. And it doesn’t require a fancy feeder, or any kind feeder at all!

This innovative woodpecker feeder actually holds suet slices in between the two resin, “bark-like” panels, thus the name Suet Sandwich Feeder. On really cold days, we’ll smear peanut butter on the the outer panels as an added bonus, and the birds love it!

With the same idea, peanut butter is also fed to squirrels – smeared right on a few tree trunks in the very back of the yard. It definitely keeps them occupied and they love it too, in fact the squirrels fight over it! Loaded with fat and protein, peanut butter packs in extra calories for furry and feathered friends alike. The calories are converted to energy which help them stay warm in freezing temperatures.

Several types of common feeders may be turned into peanut bird feeders for cold weather. A standard suet cage works great for whole peanuts, platforms and dish feeders will accommodate shelled or whole peanuts, and many hoppers will take a seed mix with peanuts added to it.

Change up the ho-hum feeding routine this winter by offering peanuts or peanut butter to your beaked buddies. You won’t even need a peanut bird feeder to do it!