Archive for the 'Glass Bird Feeder' Category

Stained Glass Bird Feeder Sale Colors!


July 20, 2016
posted by birdhouse chick @ 11:56 pm

Teal Stained Glass Bird Feeder Copper and Stained Glass Bird Feeder in Pearl WhiteThere’s some fab colors on sale, the teal house gone for good, but a few teal and dark blue stained glass bird feeders are up for grabs!

With hand hammered copper roof, these hanging feeders offer large hoppers for versatile seed options from tiny thistle to chunky mixes with peanuts, so capacity varies from 3 to 5 lbs. We recommend hanging the birdhouses in a shady area, or at least one that receives morning sun only. The white glassBlack Cherry Stained Glass Bird Feeder feeder is available, as is black cherry (birdhouse is shown for color reference).

Non-porous, smooth surface is easier to clean and healthier for birds too, no cracks or crevices for bacteria to settle into or mold to develop. Ample drainage in copper trays helps keep seed dry. Ventilation & drainage on birdhouses keep nests and babies cozy and dry.

Highly functional art for the garden, their rich color will never fade and light reflects beautifully. Squirrels can not chew them to shreds… in fact, they can’t chew the copper or glass at all! Roofs lift for easy filling & cleaning or nest removal with houses. Self hanging twisted copper chain makes them a snap to hang, from a bracket, feeder pole or branch. Simply use a clear, unobtrusive baffle if squirrels are persistent at feeders (most are).

Handmade in the USA, and definitely bird-approved, they make for elaborate and stunning gifts for any occasion. Splendid idea to nab one on sale and stash it away for an impressive holiday gift that sparkles!

And hey, there’s even a pink one… because real men hang pink birdhouses ūüôā

Pink stained glass bird feeder

PB & J in Your Glass Bird Feeder?


April 30, 2015
posted by birdhouse chick @ 3:36 am

Oriole feeder with glass cup for jellyWho doesn’t love a good ol’ PB & J sandwich?

Peanut butter’s pretty good for bird and squirrels in winter too, the extra fat and protein provide calories to stay warm. It’s the base for many types of commercially made suet cakes, and you can easily make your own!

We smear some peanut butter on squirrel corn and right on tree trunks during frigid weather. Nuthatches, woodpeckers and warblers love it! But when spring migration rolls around, it’s all about the grape jelly, plus living in Hotlanta, the peanut butter will melt too quickly!

Orioles and cat birds adore grape jelly… but don’t try and get away with the cheap stuff, they seem to prefer Welch’s!

Because it has a glass, and for all intent purposes, this fun oriole feeder is posing as a glass bird feeder for today. The cup holds enough for a few days of food, depending on your bird traffic. One really cool thing we’ve discovered with this feeder is that it can be used year-round, when migratory friends are long gone.

Swap peanut butter for jelly, and suet for the orange halves… you’ll have some very happy resident birds! Lots of online recipes for making your own suet, including no-melt varieties for warm weather feeding, find a few quick suet recipes on our site too. Form suet balls and simply cut them in half to use with this feeder in cold weather!

Check out these orioles up close, chowing down on their favorite food!

Unique Bird Feeders Can be Custom Made


November 17, 2014
posted by birdhouse chick @ 12:31 am

Unique bird feeders offering custom colors, hang or pole-mountGift idea #39-Give  favorite colors

If considering a gift of nature for someone special this year, consider one that might be customized to suit the recipient’s favorite colors, or even their favorite team.

These unique bird feeders offer a variety of stained glass hues, you can even choose two colors for a heartfelt, hand picked gift. Requested one year was a red and green option for Christmas. It sounded a tad garish for such a Copper and stained glass bird feederstunning art piece, but it actually came out beautifully…
and the recipient was thrilled!

Some other post-mounted bird feeders offer custom team colors too. Also made in the USA, durable PVC will never crack, mildew, peel or rot. See? That’s part of the beauty of these unique feeders! The quality and materials will last for years of enjoyment- by birds and their hosts alike.

Team colors offered on these unique bird feeders

Shown with standard roof choice, all styles of feeders and houses are available in 12 team choices! Check out these cool combinations for the sports-birding enthusiast on your list!

Blue-Whitevinyl birdhouses and unique feeders in team colors

Glass Bird Feeder-Yes, Glass Window Crash-No!


September 28, 2014
posted by birdhouse chick @ 2:57 pm

a glass bird feeder offers cleaner feedingTraditional wood bird feeders are most commonly seen in platform, fly-thru or hopper styles. They’re great for birds as the texture allows for easier footing or grip by tiny bird feet. But there’s something to be said for the more creative type glass bird feeder. Style for one, as many are hand made and functional works of art in the landscape. Wood eventually deteriorates while glass withstands. Wood has a porous surface which allows bacteria and mold to penetrate, glass is non-porous and much easier to clean.copper and stained glass bird feeder

It’s really just a matter of personal preference and the birds you’re wanting to attract. A Fly-Thru allows for a variety of treats throughout the year, while a hopper style only accommodates seed mixes. Just a little something for future reference… the next feeder needn’t be wood to be fully functional.

When it comes to glass, your home’s windows are hazardous, sometimes even fatal to the birds feeding in your yard. Birds simply don’t see them – resulting in violent crashes and strikes with the invisible wall. The “thump” sound is really a bummer, then you find the (hopefully) stunned bird and hope he’s okay with a few minutes rest. But many times a broken neck, or too forceful a hit renders the death of an avian friend.

WindowAlert prevents strikes at glassThe good news is it’s really easy to avoid these crashes in the first place! WindowAlert Decals are inexpensive, simple to use and most effective. No glue, no mess on windows, simply a static cling decal with a light coating that reflects ultraviolet sunlight. Barely visible to the human eye, birds see a brilliant glow warning them of the impending glass.

There’s a fantastic new product from this company as well. Working by the same principle of reflecting UV rays, it’s called UV Liquid. Similar to a bingo marker, you simply roll, or draw it right on the window to apply. Dots, circles, squiggles or lines… or anything your artsy heart might like will work! The important thing is that birds will see it loud & clear while just faint marks to your eye.Liquid-UV warns birds of windows

Either product may be used alone, but if you’ve got a big problem with window strikes that are happening all to often, it’s best to use UVLiquid in conjunction with a few decals.

With migrations underway and an increase in traffic, new birds may be visiting feeders. You can easily help them and your resident buddies avoid deadly window strikes in less than 5 minutes of your time. And oh yeah… keeping those wood or glass bird feeders clean and stocked is a great help too!

What’s Your Count? Here’ Ours-Sans the New Glass Bird Feeder


February 21, 2014
posted by birdhouse chick @ 4:12 am

Glass bird feeder with large perching area entices many different species of songbirdsActually ceramic and oh so mod, this glass bird feeder offers great versatility.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We counted on Monday, the last day for the 2014 Great backyard Bird Count. Had the event been last week-during the ice storm, more species would’ve been recorded. A warm sunny day saw a bit less activity at feeders than the first half of February when treacherous weather brought a slew of new visitors to this North Georgia yard. But with this warmer weather and the first glimpse of spring… a new glass bird feeder or two always helps to celebrate!

Stationary, the count was limited to the backyard where most of our feeders and baths are placed. Superior habitat occurs with mature pines, shrubs and hardwoods. By the way, the greatest benefit to glass feeders is the non-porous surface. Bacteria and mold can not penetrate surfaces like wood, this makes them healthier for birds. Plus they’re much easier to clean.

No woodpeckers today at the new glass bird feederBut back to the count: Again this year, participation increased over last with 131 countries reporting checklists, as opposed to 110 last year. Although data is still being entered, here’s a brief overview of country, number of species reported, and the number of checklists for that country. Pretty impressive!

United States    643    112,281
Canada    234    12,340
India    806    3,195
Australia    492    854
Mexico    658    451
Costa Rica    554    165
United Kingdom    155    150
Puerto Rico    113    150
Portugal    177    134
Honduras    335    104

Here’s our list for a 30 minute count: 22 species… not too shabby ūüôā

  • Mourning Dove 4
  • Red Bellied Woodpecker 1
  • Downy Woodpecker 1
  • Hairy Woodpecker 1
  • Eastern Phoebe 1
  • Blue Jay 2
  • Carolina Chickadee 3
  • Tufted Titmice 6
  • White-breasted Nuthatch 2
  • Brown-headed Nuthatch 1
  • Carolina Wren 2
  • Eastern Bluebird 2
  • Chipping Sparrows 9
  • Cardinal 6
  • Robin 3
  • American Goldfinch 11
  • Eastern Towhee 2
  • White-throated Sparrow 1
  • Pine Warbler 8
  • Yellow-rumped Warbler 2
  • European Starlings¬† 2
  • American Crow 3

Cornell’s data won’t be complete until the end of the month, but they’ve listed some noticeable trends:

Fewer Finches
After last year‚Äôs ‚Äúsuperflight,‚ÄĚ this year‚Äôs GBBC reports for 10 irruptive species (mostly finches) are down considerably. This includes reports for the White-winged and Red crossbills, Common and Hoary redpolls, Pine and Evening grosbeaks, Pine Siskin, Purple Finch, Red-breasted Nuthatches, and Bohemian Waxwings. These are believed to be natural fluctuations in numbers because of variation in seed crops.

Snowy Owl Invasion Continues
A massive irruption of Snowy Owls into the northeastern, mid-Atlantic, and Great Lakes States of the U.S., as well as southeastern Canada, is easily seen in GBBC numbers. Preliminary results show participants reported more than 2,500 Snowy Owls in 25 states and 7 provinces of the U.S. and Canada!

The Polar Vortex Effect
The frigid cold in many parts of North America has resulted in unusual movements of waterfowl and grebes. With the Great Lakes almost completely frozen, some species, such as the White-winged Scoter and the Long-tailed Duck, have fled the frozen lakes and stopped at inland locations where they are not usually found at this time of year.

You can still count birds!
Project FeederWatch is a winter-long survey of birds at your feeders. The lab is offering a 2-for-1 to join this fun project now.

You can always count birds!
Anytime, anywhere in the world you can report bird sightings through eBird. Use the same user name and password you used for the GBBC and keep on counting at eBird.org.
The Cornell Lab of Ornithology is a nonprofit membership institution interpreting and conserving the earth’s biological diversity through research, education, and citizen science focused on birds. Visit the Cornell Lab website at www.birds.cornell.edu

Audubon is dedicated to protecting birds and other wildlife and the habitat that supports them. Our national network of community-based nature centers and chapters, scientific and educational programs, and advocacy on behalf of areas sustaining important bird populations, engage millions of people of all ages and backgrounds in conservation. www.audubon.org

Bird Studies Canada administers regional, national, and international research and monitoring programs that advance the understanding, appreciation, and conservation of wild birds and their habitats. We are Canada’s national body for bird conservation and science, and we are a non-governmental charitable organization. www.birdscanada.org

glass bird feeder is built to last


August 9, 2013
posted by birdhouse chick @ 2:18 am

Handcrafted stained glass bird feeder never fades or rusts, chew-proof too!Although wood is good for birdhouses, it’s not always best for feeders because squirrels chew wood! Over time wood will weather, sometimes nicely-sometimes not depending on the quality. Wood is porous and therefore harbors bacteria and mold… not good for birds. Copper, glass, or recycled plastic provides a slick surface that’s more resistant to bacteria, much easier to clean and way better for the birds.

A stained glass bird feeder like this hopper model allows for various seed mixes. It won’t ever fade, warp or rust, and it’s chew-proof by squirrels. Handcrafted in the USA, it’s available in about eight different colors, and features a hand hammered copper roof.

What’s the best kind feeder to get when starting out? It’s simply got to be the one you will maintain. Basic black oil sunflower is a popular seed that many species enjoy. If you don’t care for the hulls or mess below feeders – opt for sunflower hearts or a “no-waste” mix. These cost a little more, but every morsel is consumed, no messy ground waste below feeders! Cheap seed with fillers (like milo and millet) will end up on the ground, and in damp or humid conditions, creates another breeding ground for bacteria and mold. Ground feeding birds like cardinals, towhees and juncos will sift through this junk looking for a bite to eat. Yuck!

If the only feeder you’re up to maintaining is a simple bowl, that’s okay too. Just keep it clean and keep food fresh… and they wiplain bowl or glass bird feeder - just keep it clean and keep food freshll come! And don’t forget to add a water source, a shallow bowl or plant saucer with fresh water creates a refuge on hot summer days!

Cool Pint-Sized Bird Baths


July 8, 2013
posted by birdhouse chick @ 12:55 am

Even the smallest of bird baths entice feathered friends provided water is kept freshThere’s really only one rule when it comes to enticing birds with water… keeping it fresh!

Bird Baths of all sizes and shapes are known to attract and keep birds coming back, in fact it’s the easiest way to attract them. Although depth is also important (optimal is 2-3 inches) a large rock may always be placed in the bath for safe perching should the bowl be deeper. And there’s absolutely no rule that says you must fill it to the top! Especially in summer, when lots of fledgelings are around, shallow bird baths are safest for all.

This mini-bath is a fun way to offer fresh water because it has lots of perching spots. Vibrant stained glass (in six designs) catches light beautifully, and best of all, it can be used as feeder in winter months. Is it too small for a bath? Nope… we’ve seen titmice and chickadees drinking from ant moats!

When used as a dish feeder, these mini-baths will accommodate a great variety of treats too. Seed mixes, suet & nuggets, shelled or whole peanuts, fruit, even mealworms if you’re so inclined!

Shown in the bluebird style, there’s a hummingbird, butterfly, lady bug, dragonfly and bumble bee too. Each in vibrant stained glass and copper, these pint-sized bird baths are excellent for small spaces like on the deck, patio… or even the apartment balcony!

glass bird feeder gets some stones thrown


May 30, 2013
posted by birdhouse chick @ 11:25 pm

This post actually has nothing at all to do with a glass bird feederWas it Chaucer, in a reference to vulnerability? “People who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones”. Do you know that running a website with unique birdhouses and many a glass bird feeder is one thousand times easier than trying to sell it and close a deal? This is basically just a vent it & forget sort of post, and since it’s my blog… well it’s a good place to do so.

Let me introduce some nice folks by the name of Ed and Deb, yes, those are their real names, and if I never, never hear them again it will be all too soon. Where did they come from and who are they?

Actually The Birdhouse Chick.com was listed for sale not too long ago, and there was much preparation involved in just getting it to market. It seems the technical aspects of the website, and Google’s fantastic new shopping model (not), the ever changing web, and lightening fast technology just don’t jive with the chick herself anymore – makes my head spin and it’s not what I signed up for five+ years ago.

Yes, I do this business myself; website, blog, buying and sourcing, marketing, fulfillment, janitor, customer service… everything that a 26-hour day allows! The face of retail’s changed a lot, and competing with the big boys is not my forte. In fact, certain aspects of retail are beginning to turn my stomach. One of the big ones being, who can import the most junk from overseas and sell it the cheapest? Do you know that on some “shopping channels” companies now spell the manufacturer’s name backwards to exclude them from price comparison? Oh please give me a personal break here, what’s the next low to dupe the consumer?

Our customers? Absolutely love them! They are the best, at least 20% are repeats, and many have become friends with out of state visits (Janners), text messages when it’s time to order live worms (Captain Ralph), Linda in VA who always asks for bigger discounts, a thank you and hand made gift from a customer in CA… the list goes on and on! We receive photos, lots of testimonials, and that in itself is pretty darn rewarding! You see, we (I) set out to do something different in 2008, to build a better product (business) that stood out from all the rest, in personal customer service, better quality products, and unique birding items that were not found all over the web.

But back to the story: Ed and Deb were very interested in purchasing the Birdhouse Chick.com (I think the testimonials and warm & fuzzies appealed to them, or to Deb anyway). Certainly the numbers must have done something to gain their attention too? They proceeded to make an offer, and although the offer was accepted, they sorta got cold feet and backed out. Quite understandable (especially when one’s earnest money is refunded in full) and you’ve never run your own e-commerce business before. Now what’s the point of “earnest money” if you can just walk away with a full refund? Oh yeah… they also knew nothing about running an e-commerce site, a merchant account, how you get the orders, or how the money makes to your bank. I believe the four-page prospectus/interview stated” “Someone with e-commerce knowledge, and a bit of marketing savvy would be best suited”.Altough ceramic, it breaks just like any glass bird feeder when hitting cement

Besides some local folks right here in Atlanta were interested as well (they have three websites), so after the wind had been knocked out of my sails, I thought we’d just move on. As a means of closure, I sent Ed and Deb a letter addressing their concerns. Basically it was a very polite dose of reality. Never in a gazillion years did I think they’d respond, and in retrospect, I truly wish they wouldn’t have ūüôĀ

You see, their original offer was back on the table! Huh? This really mucked up the waters now, as a choice needed to be made: Door number one with Ed & Deb, or Door number two with Atlanta folks? Well whenever there’s a 50/50 shot at the correct decision… for some reason I can manage to get that wrong 90% of the time. Since we’re already “in the works” so to speak, Ed and Deb are chosen, and it’s full steam ahead! They were double loaded with questions and concerns, and how-to’s, and yada, yada, yada. During the busy month of May, I took time to answer myriads of questions, trained on blogging, gathered a vendor list, and countless other tasks, which also in retrospect, should not have even commenced until AFTER closing. Due diligence and training definitely converged down the wrong path on this deal.

Wanting a later closing date, I asked: “Well, Ed, what if I go through all this training stuff and you back out again?” You know what he said? “We won’t do that to you again”. Now, let me state that once more: “We won’t do that to you again”. Ed was granted access to all accounts, could see daily sales, contact emails, everything pertaining to his new business to be. That’s quite a large girth for pre-closing, wouldn’t ya say? All because, “we won’t do that to you again”. Omg… how could one possibly be so stupid and survive in the business world? But I could also ask this: how does a broker allow their client to fall within such a vulnerable spot? Simply reiterating that there were “risks associated with both choices” just doesn’t seem like a whole lot of thought or effort was put forth in securing the deal or protecting the seller?

Since this story is long enough, let me just wrap it up by saying, “Yes, they did do that again” One week before closing (and because Ed and Deb got to dance with full earnest money back) they did indeed “do that to me again”. So now, the broker has lost, the brokerage firm has lost, the referrer has lost, I’ve lost a true, local buyer here in Atlanta. And to boot… what I thought was poison ivy- is shingles from the sheer stress of working with this bogus buyer and over-booked broker.

Hey Ed, may your irrigation system cause you as much pain and suffering as you’ve caused me, and may others always do unto you as you’ve done to them.

So, you wanna sell your website?¬† I’ve no good advice at this point, but hey, if you’re interested in The Birdhouse Chick.com… just give me a call or shoot an email… Glass bird feeders and all ūüôā

 

 

A true beauty of a stained glass bird feeder


December 4, 2012
posted by birdhouse chick @ 3:35 am

http://www.thebirdhousechick.com/product/BHG-DKBL-FD-DSIt shimmers, it sparkles, and light dances off its panels with grace and beauty beyond compare. This stained glass bird feeder will never fade or warp, and for the most part… it’s impervious to the elements. A generous hopper holds 3 to 5 pounds of seed, depending on the mixes’ density.

Hand hammered copper is used for the tray (with drainage) and roof, and the feeder’s topped off with a copper hanger. Wood is good, but a non-porous surface like glass or copper is much more resistant to bacterial growth. This means food stays fresher, making it a healthier feeder for your birds.Wth generous capacity, this glass bird feeder is actually healthier for wild birds

In an array of stunning colors, this artist even welcomes custom orders. A few years back, there was a holiday version created using red and green panels.

Tis the season~to remember feathered friends! And always know that a gift approved by Mother Nature is one that will actually be used and enjoyed!

 

cool glass bird feeder resembles the old mod pod


May 15, 2012
posted by birdhouse chick @ 10:22 am

Groovy Glass Bird Feeder is like the old Mod Pod, but better!Here’s a new twist on an old favorite, the Mod Pod bird feeder produced a few years ago by Birdbrain. The bright colors and groovy designs really caught folks’ attention (and birds too), so it was a real bummer when they discontinued the line of feeders.

Enter this oval glass bird feeder that’s actually frost resistant ceramic. The improved design is an added bonus because it accommodates a variety of treats for your beaked buddies! Sort of¬† like a Fly-Thru feeder, you can offer birdseed mixes, peanuts, fruit, suet, and crumbles & nuggets in this fun glass bird feeder. Change up the menu according to seasons – and who you’d like to attract. The open design also makes filling and cleaning a snap.

Shown in light lime, the Mod Oval Bird Feeder comes in cool Winter Blue as well. A high quality glass bird feeder that promises many seasons of use and enjoyment by birds and hosts too!