Archive for the 'Bird Feeder Bracket' Category

Hacks for a Bird Feeder Bracket


August 18, 2016
posted by birdhouse chick @ 4:11 pm

bird-feeder-bracket-with misterVersatility is really the name of the game when it comes to wild bird feeding accessories. For any investment, you want it to last and you want it for year-round use (should resident birds stick around your locale).

Well, these bird feeder brackets aren’t just for feeders! Several types of quality hardware brackets offer options to entice birds year round; with food in winter or fresh water in sweltering heat.

This long-reach deck-mounted bracket holds a mister out over the front porch in summer. The arm swivels making it simple to redirect the water every few days. The garden below has grown amazingly lush, and birds & butterflies both adore the mister’s gentle spray. Adult birds will fly through soaking up water in their wings and return to the nest cooling off babies. Pretty cool really… both literally and figuratively!

Round Bird Feeder Brackets like these also attach to a deck or porch rail. If the kitchen sink happens to be at a window overlooking the deck- then bam… you’ve got the ultimate window feeder too! The bracket’s perfect for a birdbath as well. No that’s not a potato, it’s a large rock used to weight down the copper bowl. Any idea how many people ask if that’s a potato?

Bird Feeder Bracket for Deck Rail

There are also brackets you can easily attach to an existing pole system. The extra arm allows for hanging 2 or 3 more feeders (or a bird bath).

Just because something is packaged/labeled a certain way doesn’t mean you can’t use it for something else. Wild bird feeding can include trial & error whether you’re just starting out or have been at it for years. Squirrels raiding the feeder? Move it and learn about baffles. No takers in your birdbath? Change the water more often and add some rocks for easy footing. Finches not eating thistle seed? Change it… it’s likely old & stale or worse, moldy. Stuff like this makes a world of difference to birds and your bird-watching enjoyment!

Experimenting and being innovative is part of the fun… because when you’re successful, the rewards are so worth the time & effort! Just feed the birds for some additional happiness in your world. See below (from the Auk-ward) birds-bring-happiness cartoon from Auk-Wardfor solid proof 🙂

Instant Set-Up Bird Feeder Brackets


November 6, 2015
posted by birdhouse chick @ 1:45 am

Bird Feeder Bracket for instant set-upAlthough we’d rather post pretty bird images, our goal is to get more folks involved with backyard birding. It’s an awesome hobby and one that’s addictive too. Here’s a good place to start:

So maybe you’re thinking about feeding the birds? But when surveying the yard for good spots to hang a feeder… there really aren’t any. A branch would work if you have suitable trees – but beware of crafty squirrels!

If the yard is mostly open, a bird feeder bracket set like this is ideal for an instant oasis to entice feathered friends. It provides a solid & sturdy spot with room to grow. The water dish and tray are included, the latter offering a spot for just about anything you’d like to offer. Peanuts, suet & nuggets, mealworms (if you’re so inclined), even fruit in spring and summer for migratory birds. Any assortment of feeders could hang here, and they’d be most welcome by resident fliers in winter. These include seed, suet, & peanut feeders and thistle/nyjer feeders for finches. Adding a baffle to the main pole will keep squirrels at bay too… believe it or not!

deck-mount bird feeder bracketSmaller scale? A simple deck-mount bracket might be the perfect answer. Especially if there’s a good view from the kitchen or breakfast area. The clamp-on hardware won’t harm deck rails, and a nice plant saucer works great for the dish. This can even be converted to a bath in summer, shallow pans are the perfect depth for birds to bathe and wade comfortably.

Another complete bird feeding station includes the baffle. As long as squirrels can’t jump sideways from something to gain access- they’ll never make it past this baffle! We use this one at home and can absolutely confirm squirrel failure!

bird feeder barcket set with baffle and augerWith all the rain in Southeast lately, the ground has become overly saturated. The auger or ground screw on this set keeps feeder stations from looking like the Leaning Tower of Pisa! We have some of those too 🙁  The topper also comes with 4 brackets for room to grow. It’s a sturdy set that lasts for life.

During winter, natural food sources become scarce as insects have died off and berries are gone. Feeders and heated baths help birds not only survive-but thrive in frigid weather. Birds bring gardens to life on the dullest winter days, there’s nothing better than hearing birdsong or seeing the vivid red of a cardinal in the yard. Try for yourself and see! Okay, maybe just one pretty bluebird 🙂

Male Eastern Bluebird

 

To the Sad Little Friend on the Bird Feeder Bracket


April 13, 2015
posted by birdhouse chick @ 8:49 pm

Both bird feeder bracket and feeder must be removedYou don’t look well little finch, so sorry but I can’t feed you anymore 🙁

Every garden pole and bird feeder bracket now sit empty, except for the single bird perched there wondering “what’s happened to my food?”

The best intentions: Down, all of the feeders have been removed in hopes of population disbursement, encouraging the birds to move on. To an avid backyard birder this is heart-wrenching, especially during nesting season and migration. Disease has been confirmed and is being spread through feeders. Even the cleanest set-up won’t stop the spread of salmonella, respiratory, or air-born diseases in birds once its taken hold. Bleached and sparkly clean feeders mean nothing since it takes only one infected bird to start the cycle again.

Safety’s not always in numbers: Finches and pine siskins tend to travel and congregate in large groups. Even though there’s ample feeding stations to accommodate them, they’re more susceptible to the spread of respiratory disease or bacterial infection when large groups feed together.

Course of action: Obligated to do the right thing because attracting birds with feeders brings with it a responsibility to those birds. First and foremost is to remove all feeders. The USGS National Wildlife Health Center lists 4 diseases and 8 precautionary steps to keep disease at bay. It will be about two weeks before the feeders are placed for use again. The ground’s been raked clean, and feeders will be sanitized with 10% bleach solution.

The sight of a sickly bird is fairly obvious if you notice the signs. Lethargic and almost easy to catch, ruffled, unkept feathers, puffed out and sometimes shaking (even though it’s not cold), and swollen eyes or eyelids. They have trouble eating and fly slowly. Upon seeing a dead pine siskin with no signs of trauma last week, the thought of disease had entered my mind. Another the next day, and then a dead goldfinch in full summer breeding plumage confirmed the realization that I’m not helping the birds… but rather killing them 🙁

So now, I’m not sure who’s more upset? The frantic cardinals perching on empty poles and feeder brackets, the confused nuthatches and chickadees who are nesting and already have clutches, or myself, the one responsible for creating the mess? Woe is me, and what a rotten way to start the week 🙁

 

Instant Window Bird Feeders – Even Window Bird Baths!


September 7, 2014
posted by birdhouse chick @ 11:03 am

Window bird feeder and window bird bath in oneThey say the kitchen is the heart of the home, with meals, conversation and most comings and goings through the door leading to the garage where vehicles are parked. Builders know it’s the sink where much time is spent and usually place a window above it for natural light, views of trees (if you’re lucky) and lush green yards.

Placing window bird feeders within this view is an optimal spot for catching the great outdoors and nature’s happenings without interrupting daily routines. If by chance the deck is off your kitchen or breakfast room, its rails are absolutely perfect for the birds! The feeder need not necessarily mount on the window itself!

A really cool and versatile bracket thing called a deck ring lets you add an instant feeder, or even a bird bath in window bird feeders with a deck ringseconds. It clamps on with simple hardware (no tools required) and best of all there’s no damage to rails. The sturdy iron ring will accommodate heavier ceramic bowls, as simple plant saucers are perfect for feeders or baths. Say you don’t want any mess that birdseed can bring? Opt for fresh water- it’s by far the easiest and best way to entice feathered friends! Add a heater to that bowl in winter and the activity promises to mesmerize… it’ll be the most popular spot in the yard.

With close-up views like these, you’ll see birds from another perspective. Right now many are looking a little sickly with streaked plumage that’s half dull and half bright. But it’s just the molting process that happens every fall. Birds are shedding old, tattered feathers for new ones to help them through another season of cooler weather.

Entice more feathered friends to your place and liven up the view from that kitchen sink quickly and easily by placing a feeder or bath right on the deck rail.

 

 

The Ever So Versatile Bird Feeder Bracket


July 21, 2014
posted by birdhouse chick @ 1:58 am

This bird feeder bracket attaches to a deck or porch rail for multiple uses. Versatility is good and mobility is even better when referring to a bird feeder bracket. Seasons change and birds migrate, so why would you want to offer the same old, same old throughout the year? Plus, once the birding bug hits, there’s always a need for one more feeder, or one more bath, or one more something in the yard! We can verify this first-hand 🙂

A simple deck-mount bracket (circled in yellow) accommodates a leaf mister during summer months. Actually mounted on the front porch, the extended arm bracket just slips right onto the rail. This makes it easy to move, and with the mister attached, makes for a happy and lush garden below. When it’s time to put the misters away in late fall, a bird bath or feeder will likely hang from the same spot. In early spring there’s always nesting materials offered in this spot.

Want to see more species of birds but limited on space? No trees to hang from and only one feeder pole in the yard? Check this cool bird feeder bracket with quick-connect that attaches right to a pole – no hardware needed. With a sleek curved shape and leaf design, there’s room for 3 or 4 more items. All of a sudden you’re seeing new birds in the same space!Branch type bird feeder bracket

No-melt suet is great for warm weather feeding as migratory birds enjoy it too. Grape jelly in an oriole feeder entices cat birds and woodpeckers.

Again, if space is limited for hanging feeders, remember that birds bathe naturally at ground level. Fresh water is the easiest way to entice feathered friends. A shallow pan of water is bound to bring some birds who may never even visit feeders. Keep the water fresh and more importantly… shallow. With lots of juveniles about, deep water can be fatal. No more than two inches is a perfect depth for birds to bathe, wade, preen and drink. Adding some stones or a few larger rocks gives birds added security with better footing, they make it easier to land and perch.

For all those who “don’t feed birds in summer” well, you happen to be missing two exciting times during the year when neotropic birds migrate. The opportunity for catching some new species pass through is pretty incredible… even for veteran backyard birders! That flash of orange from a Baltimore oriole, or the vivid colors of a painted bunting are in part what it’s all about!

 

 

The Ultimate Bird Feeder Bracket System


April 29, 2014
posted by birdhouse chick @ 8:39 pm

indigo bunting at my finch bird feederUsually only seeing one pair, today we spotted five male red-breasted grosbeaks and two females at the platform feeders. Hummingbirds and cat birds are back, several indigo buntings (the other bluebirds) are hanging around, and we managed a fleeting glimpse of a Baltimore oriole today too.

With spring migrations upon us it’s an awesome time to catch some new visitors… vivid colors abound in the landscape if you happen to be feeding birds right now.grosbeak If you’re not- it’s a primo time to start!

Offering a variety of food like fruit and jelly and fresh water affords the opportunity for migratory birds to take up residence at your place and maybe even decide to nest there. This may require a few additional feeders, but you can be crafty here and fashion non-traditional items to use as feeders. A hanging glass candle holder makes a great jelly feeder, and there’s even an orange feeder for orioles made from a wire coat hanger. The “how to” is floating around the web somewhere! Fresh water works great in a simple plant saucer, and very shallow is always best for birds’ safety.

So even if you canbird feeder bracket craft a few new feeders… you’ll need somewhere to hang them! It’s like all hands on deck… the more bird feeder brackets the better this time of year! Whether you’re a novice to backyard birding, or a long-time veteran, a good pole system just can’t be beat. If your battling pesky critters at feeders, the Squirrel Stopper comes with the most effective baffle around. From one of our customers: ‘We absolutely love the squirrel stopper so much so that my husband wanted another right away. It’s been comical around here watching the squirrels trying to win the battle of the baffle. LOL! and having to resort to what we put out for them elsewhere.”

It features four arms with eight sturdy hooks to hang any kind of feeder, even a birdbath too! Especially if your yard is small, you’ll be able to maximize with a variety of treats for featbird feeder brackethered friends.

If you’re new to the backyard birding scene, or know someone who is (hint: Mother’s Day), this complete bird feeder bracket system gets you up and running immediately! It comes with four basic feeders offering seed, peanuts, thistle and suet. That’s a fantastic mix to attract a wide variety of birds. The water dish promises to be a big hit, and the mesh tray is always open for options! Live or dried mealworms, fruit, even a cup of jelly for catbirds and orioles.

The only drawback is no baffle… we’d highly suggest using one to save your sanity and your bird food should squirrels abound in your yard!bird feeder brackets

 

Groovy bird feeder bracket lets you expand an existing garden pole


August 18, 2013
posted by birdhouse chick @ 4:11 pm

Cool branch style bird feeder bracket twists on ant standard one inch garden poleYou can now add additional feeders or even a small hanging bath without adding another garden pole to the landscape. The simple quick-connect system installs in seconds on any one inch standard garden pole. Made in the USA of heavy duty powder coat steel, this cool bird feeder bracket holds up to ten pounds.Two mealworm dishes and a shallow bath on the bird feeder barcket entice bluebirds and their young

Ideal for adding a suet or hummingbird feeder, mealworm dish, thistle sock, or even a smaller bird bath to entice feathered friends! Since variety is the spice of life, expanding offerings on your existing pole is simple with this bird feeder bracket. It lets you change things up with seasons for maximum bird attraction too. Replace fruit & jelly feeders in winter with whole or shelled peanuts, or consider an extra suet feeder to help resident birds with their need for additional fat and calories during frigid weather.

Measuring two feet in length, the innovative curved branch design with leaves offers several options for placement of any new items. In no time at all, birds will flock to this new pole hanger to check out their new goodies!

Bird feeder bracket has an easy twist-on installation, holds up to 10 pounds

a bird feeder bracket that’s not!


March 3, 2013
posted by birdhouse chick @ 1:36 am

A raised leaf mister is served well by this bird feeder bracket attached to the porch rail.It’s pretty cool when you can take an item and make it work for something other than its intended purpose. Surely there’s some scientific name for it? I do this kind of stuff all the time around the yard/wildlife habitat (which is my little slice of heaven when time allows).

This bird feeder bracket for instance, serves a leaf mister perfectly. Being a raised front porch, the bracket attaches to the porch rail and sits just right above native salvia and clematis. The beautiful thing is that the bracket can be moved if and when an area becomes too saturated from the mister.

Action? The buzz and flutter of activity in summer is stupendous! Both butterflies and hummingbirds dance, play and flit back and forth constantly. Although the salvia draws them in, the star attraction is definitely the gentle mist of water. Looks a bit strong in this photo, but it’s really not at all.

Even song birds will sit on the bird feeder bracket and very tip, just waiting for the water to start! Imagine that – birds attracted to a perch where no feeder exists! Just a downright shame there were snow flurries in Atlanta this morning 🙁 Come on spring!

simple bird feeder bracket brings roses closer for smelling!


August 1, 2012
posted by birdhouse chick @ 1:36 am

a bird feeder bracket that swivels is more user-friendlyThe back deck is a perfect place to catch close up views of avian amigos while going about your daily routine. A glimpse out the kitchen or breakfast room window may reveal a little touch of magic that literally takes you out of that routine… if you’re lucky.

Since we never have enough time to “stop and smell the roses” – bringing them closer to home makes it easier! Bird feeder brackets are made for decks or walls, and there are lots from which to choose.

Say you don’t want a feeder and messy seeds all over the deck? No-waste seed mixes eliminate mess, or try a hummingbird feeder instead. Ants are a problem with that? Nope… ant moats will take care of pesky ants.

Forget the whole feeder idea and try a birdbath! Fresh water is the most effective way to entice more feathered friends. Using a bird feeder bracket to hang a birdbath works beautifully. There’s no fuss or mess, just keep water fresh for optimal use. And don’t forget to glance out the window every so often, as a one little bird just might bring a big smile 🙂