Stained Glass Bird Feeder Sale Colors!


July 20, 2016
posted by birdhouse chick @ 11:56 pm

Teal Stained Glass Bird Feeder Copper and Stained Glass Bird Feeder in Pearl WhiteThere’s some fab colors on sale, the teal house gone for good, but a few teal and dark blue stained glass bird feeders are up for grabs!

With hand hammered copper roof, these hanging feeders offer large hoppers for versatile seed options from tiny thistle to chunky mixes with peanuts, so capacity varies from 3 to 5 lbs. We recommend hanging the birdhouses in a shady area, or at least one that receives morning sun only. The white glassBlack Cherry Stained Glass Bird Feeder feeder is available, as is black cherry (birdhouse is shown for color reference).

Non-porous, smooth surface is easier to clean and healthier for birds too, no cracks or crevices for bacteria to settle into or mold to develop. Ample drainage in copper trays helps keep seed dry. Ventilation & drainage on birdhouses keep nests and babies cozy and dry.

Highly functional art for the garden, their rich color will never fade and light reflects beautifully. Squirrels can not chew them to shreds… in fact, they can’t chew the copper or glass at all! Roofs lift for easy filling & cleaning or nest removal with houses. Self hanging twisted copper chain makes them a snap to hang, from a bracket, feeder pole or branch. Simply use a clear, unobtrusive baffle if squirrels are persistent at feeders (most are).

Handmade in the USA, and definitely bird-approved, they make for elaborate and stunning gifts for any occasion. Splendid idea to nab one on sale and stash it away for an impressive holiday gift that sparkles!

And hey, there’s even a pink one… because real men hang pink birdhouses 🙂

Pink stained glass bird feeder

A Whole New Bevy of Rustic Wood Birdhouses


July 12, 2016
posted by birdhouse chick @ 9:59 am

Rustic Wood Birdhouses are very bird-friendlyReady for upload to the site and occupancy by some feathered friends… Charlie’s done good with these new (old) rustic wood birdhouses!Tall Church Wood Birdhouse is one-of-a-kind

You won’t find them on store shelves, nor online because they’re locally made and signed by the artist (who actually enjoys his own backyard birds too). You may however find them around Atlanta as he’s been creating these unusual bird homes for the past 16 years.

No plywood on these church birdhouses, the wood is truly salvage from barns and other structures around GA and NC. Clean-outs are located either on back or with removable floor.

1.5-inch entry makes them ideal for bluebirds, Carolina wrens, chickadees, titmice and possibly a downy… these houses offer ideal digs to raise young. Lots of ventilation and proper drainage keep nests dry & cozy for chicks. Bluebirds may take to a 3rd brood this season in them, and others will find them an awesome roost for cold nights this coming winter.

Ringing bells and re-purposed hardware, along with old world jewel tones make each bird house unique for the collector (and avid backyard birder too). Very bird-friendly, they’ll host many successful broods and fledges over the years!

But it’s first come-first served as limited quantities exist. Expected for sale later this week, keep an eye out for these very functional, very unique rustic wood birdhouses!

Little or No Traffic at Hummingbird Feeders?


July 6, 2016
posted by birdhouse chick @ 4:34 pm

unique hummingbird feedersDon’t fret… it could very well pick up soon!

The most likely reason for a decline in winged traffic could be that birds are nesting. They seem to visit hummingbird feeders a little less often. Once eggs hatch, mama is buy looking for insects to feed her chicks. It would be fairly tough for her to bring back nectar for them!

Another reason could be nuisance birds. Blue jays, grackles, starlings are considered by many folks (and other birds) to be a plan old pain in the a$$. They’re lumped into a category termed “bully birds”. Jays have been known to kill both baby and adult hummingbirds, so if you have these boisterous birds in your yard- the sprites may not visit feeders as often.

Freshness counts! In steamy summer weather when temps soar into the 90’s, nectar should really be changed every two days at minimum. Sugar ferments in heat and it’s not good for the birds. Over on Facebook, there’s a group called Hummingbirds Anonymous. Pinned to the top of their wall is a simple reference guide on how often nectar should be changed coinciding with temperatures. No red dye, please! With plain pure cane sugar and water, why would you not make your own?  Ratio is always 1:4, that’s 1 cup of sugar to 4 cups of water… thanks!

Ants suck! Simply put, hummingbirds will not even consume nectar with just one ant in the liquid. If the feeder remains untouched long enough, the sprites won’t even bother to check it out. They cross it off the list as defective 🙁  Use an ant moat! Keep it filled with water and it’s a 100% effective solution for this pesky problem.Detourant Ant Moat for hummingbird feeders has innovative design

A new ant moat that’s designed differently requires filling only once in a very long while. The Detourant is a no-hassle, easy fix for ants and for all hanging hummingbird feeder styles.

It’s not too late to fix what ails your feeders, fall migration is still a couple of months away, so act now to get more tiny sprites to your place!

And if you’re in the AZ area or really fanatical about hummingbirds… don’t miss the biggest and best hummingbird festival that’s coming soon!

Sedona Hummingbird Festival
July 31 – August 2

For more info 928.284.2251 or www.SedonaHummingbirdFestival.com

Sedona hummingbird festival 2016

Bluebird Houses, Meal Worms and Pesticides


June 24, 2016
posted by birdhouse chick @ 10:18 pm

bluebirds at meal worm feederBy the sound of the title alone, you gotta figure it can’t be good, but if the information educates just one person or raises awareness, then it’s well worth the time to write.

Simply put: pesticides kill. Not only do they kill the targeted species, but affected prey also becomes poison (and fatal) for predator as well.

In a bluebird house along one monitor’s trail in a cemetery (yes, they’re great spots to host blues with open spaces and relatively limited activity) sat five eggs never to be incubated. Mom and dad who were healthy thriving parents were both found dead in the box, yet totally intact. This pair was actually banded and well known by local bluebird enthusiasts.

How does this connect to bluebird houses and meal worms? Pesticides… in the form of worm-shaped pellets! Mole baits resemble mealworms and when used properly should be placed below ground in the mole runs. Due to the inadvertent misuse of this poison by a cemetery employee, a slow and painful death came for both parents.male and female removed from bluebird house

The incident occurred a few months ago. After the bait was carelessly disbursed, a sudden cold snap had the bluebirds believing these were worms. Paralyzed without a mark on them, both perished one day apart due to paralysis from the poison. Both had gone back to the bluebird house with eggs for their final breaths.

A bit dramatic? Maybe so, But step back and look at the big picture because in nature (and life) everything is connected. We’re killing ourselves, killing pollinators and killing Mother Earth. (this post was scheduled for Earth Day).

Stop using pesticides and chemicals. Manicured lawns and gardens are passe, natural and rustic are in style! If you’re trying to attract hummingbirds, butterflies or bees for instance, do not treat or spray flowers from which they draw nectar. Please be aware and mindful to help nature thrive in your patch of green… it’s for your own good!

Thanks Paula Z. of Ohio (dedicated bluebird monitor) for letting others know about this occurrence and use of the images.

“Sad occurrence in lone box in Powell Cemetery.  Both male and female EABL were killed by Talpirid mole bait.  We had extended cold snap and snow and desperate to find food, almost certainly found some “worms”.  Male found dead in nestbox on 4-13 by me.  He was in good physical shape without a mark on him.  Female was in tree making some noise when I got there (maybe in pain, who knows?).  I removed him and left her 5 eggs there.  Following day, my friend checked box and found her dead in there too.  I contacted city to find they had put down mole bait worms – almost certainly they found them, ate them or fed them to each other…  Sad.  I removed box for several days because a new pair was there checking out box same day we removed dead female – hope worms are out of the ecosystem by now.  City won’t use poison worms again; will trap if they need to kill moles.

The dead male was banded in the nest on 7-1-13 in park that is maybe quarter mile from cemetery.  This male was progeny of “Kamakazi Kent”, very aggressive male that hits me in the head at Village Green Park – no evidence of him nesting this year yet there, but he may no longer be with us as I know he nested there for past six years.”

Rocking Accessories for Bird Baths!


June 12, 2016
posted by birdhouse chick @ 4:55 am

solar bird bath on tall stake Some how we went from Mother’s Day… right to Father’s Day! Not exactly sure how that happened, but it’s good to be back!

So many cool happenings in the bird world during May that we missed. Migratory birds on the move with all their splendid color, hummingbirds have landed just about everywhere, bluebirds on their second broods, and parents feeding fledglings everywhere to name just a few.

A common thread among all these birds? Water! Here’s a few fun accessories that keep water moving to entice more birds. They beat boring bird baths ten times over, water stays fresher, and they cost nothing to just a few pennies per day to operate.

Solar Fountain Kits for Bird Bathssolar hanging bird-bath
Greatly improved, these are ideal for existing baths. The kits are longer-lasting, no fuss and have easier to clean pumps. The panels still require full sun to operate, but there’s options for a one-piece kit or separate panel. The latter allows the birdbath to be shaded while panel receives full sun (depending on your landscape). The smaller pumps are just as powerful, so when using the spray heads be sure water does not overshoot the bowl and drain it as the pump should not run dry. Sans attachments and you’ve got a bubbler for smaller or hanging baths.

Bird Bath with Electric Pump Kit
New for the season, the Splash Pool Bubbler is perfect for deck, patio or ground. The shallow splash area and overall height let birds bathe more naturally (at ground level). It works well atop a small table or plant stand too. An electric pump allows for continuous flow regardless of what the sun’s doing that day, and the large reservoir needn’t be filled as frequently. Natural stone finish and removable decorative birds make this bird bath totally fun for feathered friends and hosts alike!

birdbath-with-bubbler

Leaf Misters
Possibly more exciting than bird baths, misters attract butterflies as well. Installation is versatile from a permanent set-up to a mobile one when attaching the tubing to a plant stake! Pick it up and move around the garden daily. This also prevents the ground from becoming too saturated in any one spot, and gardens grow lush! Songbirds will sit and wait for misters to start on hot summer days. Attaching to your outdoor spigot, the Y-valve frees up garden hose so there’s no switching connections.Leaf Misters for birds

That still leaves bird bath drippers, water wigglers, and a DIY birdbath dripper  you can make for next to zero cost (stay tuned for this article).

Add some moving water to your place and watch bird baths come alive with non-stop activity!

Grande Copper Hopper Bird Feeder for Mom!


April 29, 2016
posted by birdhouse chick @ 12:05 am

large capacity hopper bird feederA most awesome Mother’s Day gift, it hangs, it post-mounts, it holds 10 lbs. of seed… or even 20 lbs. for the serious backyard birder! Clean it with a forceful spray from the garden hose, it won’t hurt these large capacity hopper bird feeders.

She’ll use this gift everyday, even if  just a glance out the window at her busiest or most hectic times. A glimpse of nature in action has the uncanny ability to soothe the soul and calm the nerves… bird folks know this truth to be self-evident!

The hoppers are vinyl (like the siding on houses) so they really do last a lifetime, no cracking, fading, peeling or mildew. Handcrafted in the USA, and bird-approved, they’re easy to fill and clean via lift-off roof and/or pop-out finial.

Generous seed hopper bird feeder port-detailports on 4 sides allow for chunkier seed mixes which may contain peanuts (yum) and lots of perching space to accommodate several takers at once. Expect chickadees, cardinals, titmice, nuthatches and all the usual suspects for dining in high style.

Post Mounted Hopper Bird FeederThe post-mounted hoppers include decorative brackets (also done in vinyl/PVC) that slide on a standard 4×4 post. Shiny copper roofs remain that way for a minimum of 3-4 years before they start to weather and become dark. Aged patina roofs (shown above) are created using an acid wash with heat process and remain this way indefinitely. To clean environmental build-up, a soft soapy cloth and garden hose do the trick nicely.

But ya can’t wait till the last minute as each one is made to order! We’re getting them out the door within 1-2 days to make lots of Moms really happy next Sunday, but remember all the moms and all the packages being sent next week. Shipping services become inundated and standard delivery times may fall short of what’s promised.

So shake a tail feather and make this Mother’s Day extremely special with a hopper bird feeder that guaranteed for life, she’ll never, ever paint, repair or replace this one!

Newest Copper and PVC Bird Feeder- Architectural Stunner


April 13, 2016
posted by birdhouse chick @ 12:49 pm

Copper-and-PVC-Bird-Feeder with Architectural Design

It’s a stately piece, substantial in size and stunning in detail that adds some impressive curb appeal while attracting feathered friends. Birds bring gardens to life and fresh water along with food sources bring birds!

Our newest Copper and PVC bird feeder actually looks like wood (similar to all styles) but the real beauty lies in their long-term durability. They’ll withstand the harshest elements without peeling, cracking or rotting as wooden feeders are known to do over time.

Squirrels are far less likely to chew on PVC, have you ever really seen one gnawing on vinyl siding of a house? It’s extremely rare, white squirrel baffle for copper PVC bird feedersbut should they try and shimmy on up the post, there’s an unobtrusive white post-mount baffle to stop them dead in their tracks!

With a large 5-inch acrylic feeder tube that’s sheltered from elements, birds will delight in dining here season after season and for many years to come!

For even more of the finer architectural detail, a PVC seamless lamp post creates the ideal mount for this stunning feeder. No need for the standard 4×4 pressure treated wood post when installing with the lamp post. It’s available in a 4-inch, fluted style or 5-inch raised panel design.

Post mount options for Copper-PVC-Bird-FeedersYou’ll be the envy of the block with feathered friends dining in high style! All Copper and PVC bird feeders are handcrafted in the USA and guaranteed for life. New large capacity and hanging styles too!

Not So Decorative Birdhouses


April 5, 2016
posted by birdhouse chick @ 1:02 pm

Dead Boston fern with Carolina Wren's NestIt’s a Spring Thing… rebirth, new growth and spring cleaning.  While setting out a few new Boston ferns on the porch, the old ones lingered as winter shelter for birds. Upon inspection prior to tossing the plants, a nest with 5 tiny eggs. Hark… a Carolina wren decided to take up residence and rear her little ones in this not so decorative birdhouse. Rather unsightly after enduring through winter, the fern was moved a few feet to the end of the porch. Would she find it and continue to brood? Since most birds are pretty smart, chances were strong.

Because Carolina wrens are known to nest in the craziest places, it’s a good idea (and highly recommended) to check old outdoor potted plants before tossing. Knick-nacks on the porch like baskets pots or vases should be checked for nest activity prior to cleaning, moving or discarding them as these sweet songbirds seem to prefer a closeness to their hosts.

Carolina-wren-hatchlings-in-fernFretting and watching for signs of mama, the plant was inspected a few days later to find the babies had hatched… success! Now it’s only a matter of days before the not so decorative birds’ home can be discarded. Not all birds use houses, and because nests are highly camouflaged in trees and shrubs, it’s a good idea to hold off pruning and major spring clean-up until fall.

Offering safe places to nest for those who are cavity dwellers helps species thrive.Wooden bird houses are always a good bet, as are vinyl and ceramic. Metal is questionable as afternoon sun could bake nestlings if not protected by shade. Ventilation and drainage are important factors in keeping babies dry and comfy too.

Cool birdhouses like this moss and wicker number are handmade of materials birds already know, it’s perfect on the porch or any protected area for a natural yet whimsical touch. Wooden houses needn’t be boring either, just properly sized with bird-friendly features and sturdiness to raise the kids. Happy Spring!



Blue Bird Houses Have Eggs for Easter


March 27, 2016
posted by birdhouse chick @ 3:07 am

Eggs in Blue Bird Houses for Easter!
Mama Blue sure was busy the last few days. As of the previous nest check there were 0 eggs, but 4 today, an egg-stravaganza… like a special Easter gift!

The whole episode started with a squabble between blues and chickadees over blue bird houses and who will nest where. Not uncommon at all for birds to remove others’ nesting material and raise a ruckus, but  never had we seen activity like this before. Mr. Blue not only removed the moss from the birdhouse he wanted… he placed the material in a nearby house as if to say “okay, chickadee, you nest here!” The chickadee would then retrieve the moss Mr. Blue had placed inside! This activity went on for about 20 minutes until we were the ones who actually gave up!

Their nests are completely different, so the winner of choice number one box was confirmed the next day. Chickadees use moss, hair, feathers, and maybe wood chips, while Eastern bluebirds construct their nests with mostly pine needles, dried grasses or weeds. But no eggs, and a week later… no eggs 🙁 And then today 4 perfectly colored, beautiful bluebird eggs.

Not only in the Southeast, but as far north as IL and NY, bluebirds are starting earlier than usual.

happy chicks with Easter eggLonger days and warmer temperatures have much to do with it. Availability of insects nudged the earlier than usual nest starts too. So as long as the weather cooperates (no snow/ice storms or drenching rains) bluebirds will be lucky to have a good season, with at least two, possibly three broods. Grow strong and thrive little blues!

Happy Easter to All…
May you find bluebird eggs in your house today!

Accessorize and “Summerize” Heated Bird Baths!


March 20, 2016
posted by birdhouse chick @ 7:27 pm

deck-mount heated bird bath with spring robinsPart of the beauty of heated bird baths is their year-round use and versatility when it comes to accessories. The first day of spring with temperatures reaching into the 70’s, it’s time to tuck cords and/or remove heaters (in the Southeast anyway).

large rock in birdbath for birds' safetyOpt for a water wiggler, bird bath fountain or mister. And above all, remember juveniles’ safety by adding a large rock or river stones for better footing and ease of exiting water quickly if necessary.

 

Every year around this time, we remove heaters for storage. Out of the same bin comes the good stuff! Bath drippers, leaf misters, the water wiggler and fountain… because moving water simply rocks! It stays fresher longer, prevents stagnation so mosquitoes can’t lay eggs, and birds love it!

Heater removed from bird bath with solar fountain added for spring

 

Choices are many and you can’t go wrong unless the water level exceeds 4 inches- it’s too deep and birds can drown. Optimal depth is just 1.5 to 2.5 inches, and a bath with sloped sides is ideal for birds to just walk out.

Fountains may be solar or electric, water wigglers run on batteries, while misters and drippers run off the outdoor spigot. These actually use very little water, and butterflies adore the gentle mist as well. They simulate an avian spa with summer activity that promises to amaze! Accessories like these last year after year, making them an ideal investment for the garden and birds!

And for a few ideas from our our own habitat:

Leaf Mister are just as good as bird baths

chickadee at leaf mister

hanging birdbath fountain

Copper bird bath dripper